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ready for corsair?

Old 12-04-2008, 01:11 PM
  #1  
bobOflyer
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Default ready for corsair?

a little while ago i was gona get a T-28 but ended up upgrading my super cub to ailerons and have been flying it for 2 months give or take, and x-mas is less then a month away, and i figured its a good time to get a new plane . i want the corsair and even tho ive only flown my cub with ailerons ive flown lots of R/C on xplane 9, and play LOTS of video games (nothing to do with r/c and prolly dosent help at all but gets you used to using two joysticks on a controller and hand eye coordination) flown a blade cx, storm launcher, and have at least 10 aero aces(love those) and 4 or 5 yellow bees my dad bought, ive maneged not to "crash" my cub, only had a few ruff landings but nothing has broken on it, exept for 1 servo that broke because my dog roller on my wing and strip it....and the battery box was loose from landing in grass, any way how is the corsair? how much room do u need to fly it? how much wind can it handle? any mods i should do b4 flying (like i should have done to the cubs battery box),extra parts i should buy? ext. sorry for all the questions/info just want to know as much as i can b4 i go buy a plane, and more then likely im gona be buying a DX6 really soon but if not im gona get the rtf and sell the dx5 that comes with it when i get a dx6,dx7

ty for the help
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Old 12-04-2008, 02:10 PM
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yes
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Old 12-04-2008, 03:10 PM
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Bill G
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I would save some loot and equip a GWS Corsair. Very easy flyer. The ArtTech and PKZ versions are overpriced in my opinion. Also, if you're new to warbirds, you can buy 2 Corsairs from GWS at a reasonable price, and build a pretty one afterwards, in case the first gets trashed.

Also the EPP PKZ foam isn't all it's cracked up to be either, (literally) and looks terrible after a few crumples and repairs.
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Old 12-04-2008, 03:19 PM
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I've had both the GWS and ParkZone, and they are two different animals. I couldn't recommend the GWS as s second model-it's not as forgiving. Yes, the PZ is high. It's $179 ARF (add receiver and battery). The big thing is it comes with a good motor (lower kv park 480), good servos (digital metal gear...2 anyway), and a great ESC(30 amp switch mode BEC). All of it could be used in a future model. It is very stable in the air, and doesn't have many, if any, typical warbird traits.

It's also literally a battery charge away from flying, right out of the box. If you were intent on getting a Corsair, it's the one I would get. No worries about selecting the proper servos, ESC, or motor. There is no assembly except the horizontal stab. No painting, either.
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Old 12-04-2008, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill G View Post
I would save some loot and equip a GWS Corsair. Very easy flyer. The ArtTech and PKZ versions are overpriced in my opinion. Also, if you're new to warbirds, you can buy 2 Corsairs from GWS at a reasonable price, and build a pretty one afterwards, in case the first gets trashed.

Also the EPP PKZ foam isn't all it's cracked up to be either, (literally) and looks terrible after a few crumples and repairs.
I have flown both, and well...

the PZ is bigger, easier to see, and the gear holds up better for landings. it takes a larger field to land, and a much larger space to fly comfortably as a new pilot.

I learned to fly, in part, on my GWS corsair. very gentle, easy to fly plane, very forgiving. it takes a little more work, trying to set it up correctly, and if you don't get your CG right, it will be a handful.


with the PZ you're paying for convenience, good looking, just about ready to fly, right from the box. the GWS saves you some money, but is a bit more work. it will handle smaller fields, but it's smaller size could make it harder to follow..
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Old 12-04-2008, 07:47 PM
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My first warbird was a GWS p51, it's a very impressive site to behold in the air, the drawback though, out of the blue it will tip stall so you gotta be prepared. The p40 (yes I mfg. kits of them), was much more forgiving, and like myself, GWS makes their own version, and is highly recommended for a first war bird. The difference you are going to notice right off the bat, warbirds want more initial velocity upon launch, as opposed to the Cub which is a classic floater.

Something to test your skills here and to determine if you are ready for a more advanced plane. Are you still letting the plane autocorrect itself? If you still depend upon the airframe to correct your mistakes, or to self right itself, you aren't ready. You can also hone your skills more on that cub by getting quite a bit of altitude with it and flying it inverted. The plane is not designed to handle it, so it's going to always veer off to the side, this will teach you how to handle tip stalls and in general, make you a better pilot.
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Old 12-04-2008, 08:00 PM
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Okay, two suggestions:
  1. If you can fly the SuperCub with ailerons, without crashing, you're doing pretty well. However, the SuperCub is a "high wing" trainer, and the Corsair is a "low wing" warbird -- the "high wing" will correct itself becuase of a lower center of gravity -- the "low wing" will NOT correct itself, because of a higher center of gravity. Please be warned that a "low wing" aircraft will be more difficult to fly.
  2. If you decide you are ready for a "low wing" warbird (like the Corsair), I would recommend you buy a NPS (No Power System) GWS Corsair, take the electronics out of your SuperCub, and install them in the GWS Corsiar. That way, you're only investment is the $35 for the NPS GWS Corsair. If you crash it, you just move the electronics back into the SuperCub.
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Old 12-04-2008, 09:22 PM
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by auto correct do u mean if im in a turn or loose control i just let go of the sticks and let it correct its self? if it is i dont do that, if i give it left stick to turn i will usualy give it right sick to hold it there or make it straight its self, as far as loosing control, i just do my best to correct it b4 i hit the ground. i dont really give the plane a chance to fly itself inless im triming it lol oh and i forgot to put that it was the PZ corsair.....i forgot how meany there were srry :o
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Old 12-04-2008, 09:35 PM
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ive only flown the pz corsair..only takes about 4 feet for take off..landing a good bit more..it is a floater.very gentle on low rates.id say easy flyer.maybe not as easy as the t-28 tho.imho.good electronis come with it.
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Old 12-04-2008, 09:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Manta1 View Post
ive only flown the pz corsair..only takes about 4 feet for take off..landing a good bit more..it is a floater.very gentle on low rates.id say easy flyer.maybe not as easy as the t-28 tho.imho.good electronis come with it.
Ya'll need to learn to "slip" them floater's so they'll land where you want um to, It's the best way to cross-wind land a floater in too!, bub, steve
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Old 12-04-2008, 11:56 PM
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Surprisingly (at least to me) the Corsair airframe seems to make for a very easy to fly RC airplane, so I think it would be a good choice for someone who has mastered the SC. I have heard it said about GWS, ParkZone and ArtTech (first hand knowledge) for the foamies, and even about some of the balsa ARF's (Great Planes and World Models), that the Corsair is honest and stable in the air. I really love my ArtTech Corsair, though I agree that it is overpriced (I bought mine from HobbyCity for less than half what Hobby Lobby currently sells it for).

GWS may be the best deal, but IMHO it is too small. ArtTech is probably the most scale (except for the paint job), but it is underpowered and replacement parts are very difficult to find. Upgrade the motor and it's a great flying plane! PZ is a a good size, spare parts are available, and it's not underpowered at all with the recommended motor. A good choice IMO.
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Old 12-12-2008, 07:52 PM
  #12  
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Hi bobOflyer,

If you are set on getting the Corsair, there is no comparison between the GWS and the PZ versions. The PZ is a dream to fly compared to the GWS. If you can fly the SC well with the ailerons, you should have little trouble flying the Corsair. The only thing that I would caution is that you need considerably more landing room and the landing strip needs to be fairly flat and smooth. Forget about landing the Corsair in grass. If your landing area isn't particularly smooth or if you need to land in short grass, get the Trojan. The Trojan and Corsair fly almost identically, but the Trojan takes off and lands much better. If you decide to get the Trojan, get the PNP and buy the Corsair's radio for it.
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Old 12-12-2008, 09:42 PM
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...hmmmm... that sounds expensive... :o
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Old 12-12-2008, 10:03 PM
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I'd say yo are absolutely ready to go for the bigtime! Put that baby together, perform a thorough pre-flight radio check, and GO FLY IT?
Then come back and tell us how well you did.
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Old 12-13-2008, 01:46 AM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by Lieutenant Loughead View Post
...hmmmm... that sounds expensive... :o
Yeah no kidding. If you get a DX5 for free with a RTF plane that is one thing, but why would you buy one seperately? The DX5 does not have multi-model programming. If you know you'll never want to fly another plane with it then fine, but otherwise get yourself a DX7 or even something on 72mHz that is programmable.
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Old 12-13-2008, 02:44 AM
  #16  
Bill G
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Originally Posted by FlyingMonkey View Post
I have flown both, and well...

the PZ is bigger, easier to see, and the gear holds up better for landings. it takes a larger field to land, and a much larger space to fly comfortably as a new pilot.

I learned to fly, in part, on my GWS corsair. very gentle, easy to fly plane, very forgiving. it takes a little more work, trying to set it up correctly, and if you don't get your CG right, it will be a handful.


with the PZ you're paying for convenience, good looking, just about ready to fly, right from the box. the GWS saves you some money, but is a bit more work. it will handle smaller fields, but it's smaller size could make it harder to follow..
Your one key statement is probably where the comparisons of the PKZ being better come from. I've been teaching my buddy on the GWS Corsair with a cord, and have put a lot of effort in experimenting with it along the way. What I've found is that this plane has a very small CG range for good flying. Literally 1mm aft of ideal and you have spriral instability. Go forward much at all, and you have a lawn dart. At the "sweet spot" it's excellent.
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Old 12-15-2008, 11:24 AM
  #17  
bobOflyer
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first thx for all the replies comments ext. ive just found somthing out that may make me get the T-28, according to my dad, he went to the hobby shop and started talking to the guy and he said that the parkzone corsair is unstable and underpowered in are high altitude, but the T-28 flys great here. now i dont see why the guy at the hobby shop would have any reason to lie because the T-28 is cheaper then the corsair.
but im thinking my dad might have gotten mixed up because he is referring to the T-28 as the "navy" one and the corsair as the "blue one" and the first time he went in there he thought the corsair was the PZ P-51, i dont really know if it is true or he is just "misinformed" about whats what but he is insisting that its the PZ corsair and pointed to it on a catalog the guy gave to him, and the guys there have been really helpfull considering the first hobby shop i went to new squat about planes and wanted to sell me a PZ spit fire, and the first thing the guys at the other hobby shop (no i didnt tell him i went to another hobby shop first) told me it flys like crap and that the super cub or slow stick would be the way to go, so i bought one and love it so the point of this hole thing is that is any of it true about the corsair in your opinions? P.S. we are in reno nevada (4498 ft above sea level)

quick edit at 3:00 in the morning lol, he all so said the corsair breaks really easy and that the T-28 is really durable

thx

Last edited by bobOflyer; 12-15-2008 at 11:56 AM.
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Old 12-15-2008, 04:24 PM
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Originally Posted by bobOflyer View Post
first thx for all the replies comments ext. ive just found somthing out that may make me get the T-28, according to my dad, he went to the hobby shop and started talking to the guy and he said that the parkzone corsair is unstable and underpowered in are high altitude, but the T-28 flys great here. now i dont see why the guy at the hobby shop would have any reason to lie because the T-28 is cheaper then the corsair.
but im thinking my dad might have gotten mixed up because he is referring to the T-28 as the "navy" one and the corsair as the "blue one" and the first time he went in there he thought the corsair was the PZ P-51, i dont really know if it is true or he is just "misinformed" about whats what but he is insisting that its the PZ corsair and pointed to it on a catalog the guy gave to him, and the guys there have been really helpfull considering the first hobby shop i went to new squat about planes and wanted to sell me a PZ spit fire, and the first thing the guys at the other hobby shop (no i didnt tell him i went to another hobby shop first) told me it flys like crap and that the super cub or slow stick would be the way to go, so i bought one and love it so the point of this hole thing is that is any of it true about the corsair in your opinions? P.S. we are in reno nevada (4498 ft above sea level)

quick edit at 3:00 in the morning lol, he all so said the corsair breaks really easy and that the T-28 is really durable

thx
Some hobby shops will give good advice while others will say anything to move inventory. My guess: this shop has a bunch of T-28's on the shelf and in the back room. Both of these planes are about the same size and weight and are powered the same. They are also made of the exact same material, so if they are saying one is more breakable than the other, then they are either lying or they don't know what they are talking about. Now the PZ Mustang and Spit are another matter. They are smaller, made of hollow foam (more breakable), and come with brushed motors (less powerful). And as far as the Spit being a bad flyer, it is just not true. They gave you good advice (start with a Super Cub or Slow Stick) but for the wrong reasons. The Spit is a great flyer, even with a brushed motor, but it's not a good beginner plane.

I'm not saying to NOT shop at the LHS. Do give them your business whenever it makes sense to do so, but take their advice with a grain of salt.
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Old 12-15-2008, 05:06 PM
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i dont know how altitude affects planes where you are,but the corsair is a great flying bird here in ga.I own a t-28 and have flown a corsair that belongs to my buddy.it is not underpowered by any means.Now,I believe the t-28 handles better ie easier for beginners.it is also easier to see or maintain orientation.(my opinion of course) durability,i have beat the daylights out of my trojan,if it is windy i always fly it first to guage whether or not i wanna fly my more spensive planes.lol i think the trojan will handle wind better than the corsair but not sure.
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Old 12-15-2008, 10:04 PM
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According to Wikipedia:

"Reno is situated just east of the Sierra Nevada on the western edge of the Great Basin at an elevation of about 4,400 feet (1300 m) above sea level."

"At about 1,050 feet (320 m) above mean sea level (the airport is at 1,010 feet (308 m)), Atlanta sits atop a ridge south of the Chattahoochee River."


So, yes, altitude will make quite a bit of difference between Atlanta and Reno... The air is much thinner, so the prop won't "bite" the air as well in Reno (as opposed to Atlanta) -- also, the wing will need more speed to maintain lift in Reno (as opposed to Atlanta). (Interestingly enough, the full-throttle amp draw will be lower in Reno (at high altitude), than in Atlanta.)


Both the Trojan and the Corsiar have brushless motors, and both have a 30-ounce flying weight. So, it really boils down to the wing area (the airplane with the larger wing area will fly better at any altitude). I can not seem to find the specifications on the wing area of either aircraft -- can someone help me?


That being said, I've flown the Trojan at 213 meters (700 ft) above sea level -- and it's a really easy flying airplane (if you've mastered ailerons).
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Old 12-15-2008, 11:15 PM
  #21  
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well i dont think he had allot of T-28s cuz they dont keep allot of planes in stock, when i asked aout the t-28 he said he can order one (same with the corsair) he told me the same stuff my dad said he did, mainly sayig that because of are thin air at and high altitude that some planes will fly great and then when u fly um here they get real wobbly at slower speed sometimes bad enough to crash, and the props need to pull allot of air witch makes u use allot of throttle so battery dies real quick, and they dont fly as fast because they dont pull as much air witch means they get less lift,so, all of that combined is why it dosent fly well, witch is what he was saying about the PZ p-51 and spitfire
"because they are underpowered to begin with, when u slow um down they wobble and lose control" ....or.... he IS just trying to sell me a T-28, the only thing is i dont know if i would want to risk it? my dad said he talked to "a bunch of guys about it" that said it did not fly here. now... from all the videos and comments i have seen on this plane it looks to fly well and have lots of power, ive never seen one flying here at any of the R/C fields or parks so i guess intill i do i wont know for sure, i can buy it and it ends up working or buy it and it dose not, i guess ill have to think if i want to take that risk or not
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Old 12-15-2008, 11:35 PM
  #22  
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Whatever you decide on, you might try experimenting with different props. A prop that will over-amp a motor at sea level will draw less at high elevation and could give you better performance.
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Old 12-16-2008, 01:32 AM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by Fly Time View Post
Whatever you decide on, you might try experimenting with different props. A prop that will over-amp a motor at sea level will draw less at high elevation and could give you better performance.
This is true -- yet the airplane will still have a high-stall-speed issue... :o

Also, for the record, the higher altitude will NOT cause your battery to run down any faster than at low altitude. The reason is because the motor experiences less "load" in thinner air (at high altitude), and the amp draw is lower!

So, yes -- you DO need a higher throttle to keep the airplane in the air at higher altitude. But, the amp draw is lower, so the flight time should be about the same.
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Old 12-16-2008, 02:17 AM
  #24  
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i saw whichever you like the looks of better,buy it and enjoy
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Old 12-16-2008, 01:01 PM
  #25  
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For me the T28 Parkzone Trojan with its beautiful handling wins hands down, have the Parkzone Spits abit faster and loads of fun but not as friendly, both beauties inflight...

Next level later would strongly suggest a pusher jet as the ReadytoFlyFun Thunderbat, fortunate to stumble onto one of these and its flights are off the charts, has gyro for ailerons, is abit small simply keep her close, speeds, nice up to 70 MPH, its a winner, two other jets hit the turf, this one flys fantastic, not a wimp here, great, PNP version thru December 29th for $109 instead of normal $149, save 40 bucks, ordered the PNP for a spare, its that good, but save it for after mastering a warbird, loving mine...

If your a fast sporty flyer get the Thunderbats regular lipo, if you a slow flyer as myself start with the trainer lipo flys it just above stall speed but gave me a chance to master this bird...nearing 60 flights now, wow..<>...

http://www.readytoflyfun.com/thxfre.html

Ooops need the code FLYRC63 from Fly RC mag to get the reduced sale price..
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