Power Systems Talk about motors, ESC speed controllers, gear drives, propellers, power system simulators and all power system related topics

soldering deans

Old 08-07-2013, 10:40 PM
  #1  
sticks
sticks
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 52
Default soldering deans

I bought some soldering adapters for Deans plugs some time ago and can not find them again.

They slid onto the deans soldering tab and the other end is a round socket hole that let you solder wire into it. they make it a lot easier to use deans plugs.

sitcks
sticks is offline  
Old 08-07-2013, 10:51 PM
  #2  
NJSwede
3D wannabe
 
NJSwede's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,893
Default

IMHO, those easy-solder adapters are useless and all they do is to introduce another point of failure.

A chisel tipped iron at about 700F and rosin core solder is the ticket. Regular lead-free solder has a way too high melting point and makes it very challenging to solder.

I don't know where on the planet you're located, but if you absolutely want the ez-solders and you're in the US, you can find them here:

http://www.headsuphobby.com/MPI-EZ-S...lugs-B-205.htm
NJSwede is offline  
Old 08-07-2013, 11:02 PM
  #3  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by NJSwede View Post
IMHO, those easy-solder adapters are useless and all they do is to introduce another point of failure.

A chisel tipped iron at about 700F and rosin core solder is the ticket. Regular lead-free solder has a way too high melting point and makes it very challenging to solder.

I don't know where on the planet you're located, but if you absolutely want the ez-solders and you're in the US, you can find them here:

http://www.headsuphobby.com/MPI-EZ-S...lugs-B-205.htm
Funny

All the positive comments on this type of connector, and you still need to buy accessories to make them easy to solder to! In any case, a quality soldering iron such as the temperature regulated Weller 100 watt iron makes soldering these types of connectors a couple second project. Trying to solder Deans and similar connectors with a unregulated 30 watt soldering iron is a lesson in frustration. This type of soldering iron is either to hot, or not hot enough.

As for me, those APP connectors work nicely, just crimp their terminals to the wire, and you're done. If you really need high current, those EC5 connectors will handle a LOT of current.
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 08-07-2013, 11:06 PM
  #4  
NJSwede
3D wannabe
 
NJSwede's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,893
Default

Aaaah! Connector wars!!!!

Yeah, I've moved to Andersons on my bigger stuff (58" and up as of right now). Mainly because it's a breeze to hook them up in series (and because I bought a used plane that already had them installed on the ESC)
NJSwede is offline  
Old 08-07-2013, 11:13 PM
  #5  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by NJSwede View Post
Aaaah! Connector wars!!!!

Yeah, I've moved to Andersons on my bigger stuff (58" and up as of right now). Mainly because it's a breeze to hook them up in series (and because I bought a used plane that already had them installed on the ESC)
Yeah, and if you want to use the beefier "Original" APP connectors, check out this thread:

Anderson Power Poles???
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=64539
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 08-07-2013, 11:34 PM
  #6  
crxmanpat
Community Moderator
 
crxmanpat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 6,892
Default

I use a cheap Radio Shack 40W soldering iron. I can solder up a Deans plug in about 2 minutes flat. Here are the secrets to success:

Tools needed:

40W or higher soldering iron with chisel tip
Thin rosin core solder
Helping hands or some other jig to hold the plug

Step 1 - Tin the wires to be soldered up to the plug (if not tinned already).

Step 2 - Connect a pair of Deans plugs together (male and female). This helps keep the contact pins from moving out of alignment during soldering.

Step 3 - With a tinned iron tip (very important!), tin the connection pins on the Deans plug.

Step 4 - Give the tinned wire a quick heat up to temp, then attach to the Deans pin heating both simultaneously. (Don't forget to put your shrink wrap on first!)

Easy peasy lemon squeezy!
crxmanpat is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 01:05 AM
  #7  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by crxmanpat View Post

Step 4 - Give the tinned wire a quick heat up to temp, then attach to the Deans pin heating both simultaneously. (Don't forget to put your shrink wrap on first!)

Easy peasy lemon squeezy!
And, don't forget to keep your shrink wrap several inches from the solder connection! or
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 10:52 AM
  #8  
sticks
sticks
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 52
Default thanks

ya, maybe its time to move up to a better soldering iron. I have been soldering most of my life and value good equipment.

I am staying with dean's , just because I have so much stuff with dean's on them.

I WISH DEAN'S WOULD PUT A BETTER END ON THIER CONECTORS, DO YOU HEAR ME DEAN'S!!!!!!!

Thanks again for the help, "I'm a man, I can do better I think" Red Green

sticks
sticks is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 12:38 PM
  #9  
sticks
sticks
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 52
Default yes

Originally Posted by crxmanpat View Post
I use a cheap Radio Shack 40W soldering iron. I can solder up a Deans plug in about 2 minutes flat. Here are the secrets to success:

Tools needed:

40W or higher soldering iron with chisel tip
Thin rosin core solder
Helping hands or some other jig to hold the plug

Step 1 - Tin the wires to be soldered up to the plug (if not tinned already).

Step 2 - Connect a pair of Deans plugs together (male and female). This helps keep the contact pins from moving out of alignment during soldering.

Step 3 - With a tinned iron tip (very important!), tin the connection pins on the Deans plug.

Step 4 - Give the tinned wire a quick heat up to temp, then attach to the Deans pin heating both simultaneously. (Don't forget to put your shrink wrap on first!)

Easy peasy lemon squeezy!

yes, this is how I solder them. but I looked at my iron and its only 25 watts. I will get a better one!
thanks

sticks
sticks is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 02:08 PM
  #10  
drummaker
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Indiana
Posts: 231
Default

Originally Posted by sticks View Post
I bought some soldering adapters for Deans plugs some time ago and can not find them again.

They slid onto the deans soldering tab and the other end is a round socket hole that let you solder wire into it. they make it a lot easier to use deans plugs.

sitcks
I have discovered that if you are having trouble soldering these then you probably don't have enough heat.

Buy a gun, Ditch the iron, You will be amazed.
drummaker is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 02:38 PM
  #11  
Walt Thyng
Walt
 
Walt Thyng's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: St. Charles, Illinois
Posts: 381
Default

Most of the problems I've seen with Deans connectors in 20 years of flying electric are caused by too much heat. Usually associated with poor soldering technique. I use a 30 watt iron and follow the four steps outlined in a previous post.

Walt
Walt Thyng is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 03:00 PM
  #12  
crxmanpat
Community Moderator
 
crxmanpat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 6,892
Default

I no longer use Deans, but instead get the XT plugs from Hobby King. Same as Deans except they have ridges molded into the plastic that make them MUCH easier to grip and pull apart. Quality is just as good as Deans, and much cheaper too.
crxmanpat is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 05:18 PM
  #13  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by sticks View Post
yes, this is how I solder them. but I looked at my iron and its only 25 watts. I will get a better one!
thanks

sticks
Not cheap at about $55. But this is the last higher powered soldering iron you'll ever need to buy.

http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=59884

And a general thread on soldering equipment:
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=69147

As for soldering guns, I've got three of them. They are getting dusty in my "Old soldering Iron Bin" in my workshop. One soldering gun is rated at 300 watts, and is absolutely no match for that 100 watt Weller temperature regulated soldering iron.

At work we had some custom designed temperature regulated soldering irons rated at 1000 watts. You can bet they were not cheap.

In fact at work, before retiring, soldering guns were not allowed in the production lines. The temperature of that tip can range from to cold, to well over 1000 degrees F.
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 05:23 PM
  #14  
drummaker
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Indiana
Posts: 231
Default

Originally Posted by kyleservicetech View Post
Not cheap at about $55. But this is the last higher powered soldering iron you'll ever need to buy.

http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=59884

And a general thread on soldering equipment:
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=69147

As for soldering guns, I've got three of them. They are getting dusty in my "Old soldering Iron Bin" in my workshop. One is rated at 300 watts, and is absolutely no match for that 100 watt Weller temperature regulated soldering iron.

In fact at work, before retiring, soldering guns were not allowed in the production lines. The temperature of that tip can range from to cold, to well over 1000 degrees F.
A gun is fine unless you are trying to solder on a circuit board or something. It gets hot fast. it gets hot enough to tin whatever you want, and it gets hot enough to melt the solder on heavy wires AND the plug.

If you don't want to get them too hot. Don't leave it on that long.

I guess what I really meant though is get something hot enough to do the job.

I love my gun however. This type of soldering is what they were designed for.
drummaker is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 05:30 PM
  #15  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by drummaker View Post
A gun is fine unless you are trying to solder on a circuit board or something. It gets hot fast. it gets hot enough to tin whatever you want, and it gets hot enough to melt the solder on heavy wires AND the plug.

If you don't want to get them too hot. Don't leave it on that long.

I guess what I really meant though is get something hot enough to do the job.

I love my gun however. This type of soldering is what they were designed for.
Yeah
I've used my various soldering guns for many years, the first one was purchased in the 1950's. And, someone who is really good at soldering will have no problems soldering stuff within the guns ability to solder it.

It's kind of like launching a smaller sailplane with a winch. The pilot needs to "Pulse" the winch repeatedly in order to not bust up his sailplane.

Problem is, more than a few wattflyer readers will "leave the gun on to long", and severely overheat the plastic on connectors such as these Deans units.
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 07:18 PM
  #16  
drummaker
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Indiana
Posts: 231
Default

Originally Posted by kyleservicetech View Post
Yeah
I've used my various soldering guns for many years, the first one was purchased in the 1950's. And, someone who is really good at soldering will have no problems soldering stuff within the guns ability to solder it.

It's kind of like launching a smaller sailplane with a winch. The pilot needs to "Pulse" the winch repeatedly in order to not bust up his sailplane.

Problem is, more than a few wattflyer readers will "leave the gun on to long", and severely overheat the plastic on connectors such as these Deans units.
If that is the case. then they need to learn how to solder.
drummaker is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 08:48 PM
  #17  
CHELLIE
Super Contributor
 
CHELLIE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Hesperia, So. Calif
Posts: 19,264
Default

Originally Posted by crxmanpat View Post
I no longer use Deans, but instead get the XT plugs from Hobby King. Same as Deans except they have ridges molded into the plastic that make them MUCH easier to grip and pull apart. Quality is just as good as Deans, and much cheaper too.
+1

Ditch The Deans and use XT60 connectors, these have the wire already soldered on to the connector, its just a matter of connecting one wire to another, Much easier and its worth the trouble to Replace all of those hard to get together and pull apart Deans, I have had problems with the Dean Connector shorting out, the tension spring sometimes bends and shorts out the lipo and kills the lipo, had this happen twice so far, No More with the Much better XT60 connectors. I hate to solder wires on connectors, What A PITA Now its just a simple task of cutting, stripping and soldering on the XT60 connector wire to wire, Much better and Less work.



http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...5pcs_bag_.html

http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...5pcs_bag_.html
CHELLIE is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 08:57 PM
  #18  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by CHELLIE View Post
+1

Ditch The Deans and use XT60 connectors, these have the wire already soldered on to the connector, its just a matter of connecting one wire to another, Much easier and its worth the trouble to Replace all of those hard to get together and pull apart Deans, I have had problems with the Dean Connector shorting out, the tension spring sometimes bends and shorts out the lipo and kills the lipo, had this happen twice so far, No More with the Much better XT60 connectors. I hate to solder wires on connectors, What A PITA Now its just a simple task of cutting, stripping and soldering on the XT60 connector wire to wire, Much better and Less work.
]
And, again those Anderson Power Pole connectors. I can assemble a half dozen APP connectors, (Or IMHO the original higher quality APP connectors sold by Allied Electronics. ) in the time it takes to set up, solder, heat shrink one of the Deans connectors.

It's interesting, the web sites for those APP rates their connectors at 35 Amps, vs the Allieds 45 Amp rating.

For really high currents though, those EC5 connectors are hard to beat. Just wish APP made an "in between" connector between their 45 Amp and their 75 Amp units.
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 09:02 PM
  #19  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by CHELLIE View Post
+1

Ditch The Deans and use XT60 connectors, these have the wire already soldered on to the connector, its just a matter of connecting one wire to another, Much easier and its worth the trouble to Replace all of those hard to get together and pull apart Deans, I have had problems with the Dean Connector shorting out, the tension spring sometimes bends and shorts out the lipo and kills the lipo, had this happen twice so far, No More with the Much better XT60 connectors. I hate to solder wires on connectors, What A PITA Now its just a simple task of cutting, stripping and soldering on the XT60 connector wire to wire, Much better and Less work.

If you want to "Butt Splice" those heavy duty #10-#12 wires, take a run to your local craft store, and pick up a roll of copper craft wire. I've got a roll of #26 copper wire by Craft Designer.

Strip both #12 wires a 1/4 to 3/8 inch or so, lay them side by side, and tightly wrap the junction with a half dozen turns of that #26 copper wire. Now, you've got a solid mechanical connection, and this makes soldering the wires much easier.
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 08-08-2013, 09:56 PM
  #20  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by drummaker View Post
A gun is fine unless you are trying to solder on a circuit board or something. It gets hot fast. it gets hot enough to tin whatever you want, and it gets hot enough to melt the solder on heavy wires AND the plug.

If you don't want to get them too hot. Don't leave it on that long.

I guess what I really meant though is get something hot enough to do the job.

I love my gun however. This type of soldering is what they were designed for.
Just a note, if you ever try to solder a #12 wire to an A123 cell, that requires a LOT of heat right now. A soldering gun just can't do it. It doesn't have the mass of copper to instantly heat up the required solder connection. My big soldering gun has been tried, with no luck. By the time you've heated up that A123 cell hot enough to solder to it, you've damaged the cell. And that is even with the solder tabs provided by www.voltmanbatteries.com. (I've used several hundred of those A123 cells while building up various battery packs, both for myself, and for other club members.)
kyleservicetech is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
kyleservicetech
Batteries & Chargers
19
03-17-2020 04:43 PM
kyleservicetech
Electronic Builders Workshop
9
09-03-2013 10:06 PM
brandonwilcox
Maxamps discussion
6
08-20-2012 07:28 PM
sql_yoda
General Electric Discussions
20
07-20-2012 04:32 AM
kyleservicetech
Batteries & Chargers
5
01-08-2011 03:44 AM

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Quick Reply: soldering deans


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.

Page generated in 0.10303 seconds with 15 queries