Electronic Builders Workshop Discuss how to build motors, ESC's, chargers, mixers, etc here

Motor lead damaged, soldering an extension?

Old 10-30-2013, 09:56 PM
  #1  
Firestem4
inexorably eccentric
Thread Starter
 
Firestem4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: So-Cal
Posts: 256
Default Motor lead damaged, soldering an extension?

I hope someone can give me some advice. I had an accident when moving one of my planes around the office. Something heavy fell on the nose and it snapped the motor off of the plane and ripping one of the bullet connects off of the motor lead.

I can solder another bullet connector on just fine, but the lead was clipped by over an inch. Will that cause any issues? Should I solder a small extension to the lead before adding the bullet connector?

I'm also curious if i can do the same thing if I ever have any wire damage in the future, solder on another lead to repair a break? Server wires or esc wires?

And does anyone have a good recommendation for a wire stripper?

Thanks!
Firestem4 is offline  
Old 10-31-2013, 12:51 AM
  #2  
JetPlaneFlyer
Super Contributor
 
JetPlaneFlyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Aberdeen, Scotland
Posts: 6,120
Default

If you shorten the motor wires it's very difficult to solder to them because the wires consist of multiple hair like strands each coated with high temperature insulating lacquer that's very hard to remove. No solvent that i know of will remove it. The solder will not make a good joint unless this lacquer is completely removed. The end of the wire where the bullet attaches has the lacquer removed in the factory to allow soldering but if you remove that part you have a problem.

One way that I've heard is supposed to work is to use an Aspirin. You place the end of the wire on the Aspirin and heat with a soldering iron. the hot Aspirin generates a strong acid that removes the lacquer, but at all costs avoid breathing the fumes.
JetPlaneFlyer is offline  
Old 10-31-2013, 05:20 AM
  #3  
Firestem4
inexorably eccentric
Thread Starter
 
Firestem4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: So-Cal
Posts: 256
Default

I see..so risk death via inhalation or just chuck the motor and buy a replacement? I didn't know about the lacquer, so considering that it seems too much effort to try and repair it.

edit: did some googling, it looks like paint stripper/enamel remover or a copper abrasive can do the job to remove the lacquer. I might try that, i'm not comfortable with dangerous fumes since I don't have a hood or any way to properly ventilate doing something like that.
Firestem4 is offline  
Old 10-31-2013, 02:45 PM
  #4  
rcers
Super Contributor
 
rcers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Trophy Club TX
Posts: 6,314
Default

You should not inhale the fumes when soldering either. I just use a small fan pointing away not that big a deal. Think of how many inhale toxic smoke purposefully into their bodies.

Just sayin' don't be too afraid.
rcers is offline  
Old 10-31-2013, 08:37 PM
  #5  
Firestem4
inexorably eccentric
Thread Starter
 
Firestem4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: So-Cal
Posts: 256
Default

Well the fumes from soldering i understand aren't safe, but theres something more frightening about heating up medicine than melting metal and flux :P
Firestem4 is offline  
Old 10-31-2013, 08:48 PM
  #6  
rcers
Super Contributor
 
rcers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Trophy Club TX
Posts: 6,314
Default

Asprin is pretty harmless stuff - just acetylsalicylic acid. Just use the small fan it will suck all those fumes away from you and on to your kids. Much better solution.

Again risk = LOW. Less than getting struck by lightning. Life is good, don't sweat the small stuff.

Mike
rcers is offline  
Old 10-31-2013, 11:54 PM
  #7  
Firestem4
inexorably eccentric
Thread Starter
 
Firestem4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: So-Cal
Posts: 256
Default

Oh.. From what i read online people made it sound very dangerous. Guess I was mistaken. I'll give it a try
Firestem4 is offline  
Old 11-01-2013, 03:45 AM
  #8  
Old 'N Slow
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 74
Default

.

Last edited by Old 'N Slow; 11-17-2013 at 04:41 PM.
Old 'N Slow is offline  
Old 11-01-2013, 06:07 AM
  #9  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by Old 'N Slow View Post
The fumes from Aspirin - asa - acetylsalicylic acid - can in fact be very dangerous if inhaled. I wouldn't try that method.

I've dealt with the product in bulk, and during manufacture.

The fumes are hydroscopic - water-loving. The fumes - gaseous asa - will bond with water in your nasal passages, throat, lungs, etc. forming extremely corrosive, highly concentrated acid. You could loose your sense of smell, possibly forever, or burn the surfaces of your lungs. Causing them to fill with fluid.

Buy a new motor.
Yeah
After operating a soldering iron for to many years to count, I've gotten sensitive to soldering fumes.

So my workbench has a high powered exhaust fan that sucks fumes out through a 4 inch metal dryer hose, and blows it outside the house. This thing works very well. Problem is, those exhaust fans are not readily available, and are danged expensive. I found mine in the scrap bin at work before retiring.

Here is one alternative way to handle the situation.
http://www.instructables.com/id/Solder-Fume-Extractor/
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 11-01-2013, 03:40 PM
  #10  
Old 'N Slow
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 74
Default

.

Last edited by Old 'N Slow; 11-17-2013 at 04:40 PM.
Old 'N Slow is offline  
Old 11-01-2013, 05:25 PM
  #11  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by Old 'N Slow View Post
Ha! Truth.
Our motto is if it isn't food or drink, then you should avoid smelling it, breathing it, or getting it on you.
One reason I use very little CA, and what little I do use is near that exhaust system. As for epoxy, I always use disposable gloves with it. Seems when done with epoxy, there is always some of it on those gloves.
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 11-01-2013, 05:30 PM
  #12  
flydiver
Super Contributor
 
flydiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 2,668
Default

You don't have to bother with aspirin. Just get an Xacto knife and scrape it. I don't personally know why people like this method. I tried it (yes, real ASA with no coating), thought it sucked. But then, I think CA sucks also.

But, that's IF it needs scraping. Some motor leads already have an extension on them. Those you just strip and solder to.

MAGNETIC MOTOR WIRE that is used in winding needs the insulating coating removed or solder won't stick. Having said that if the motor is wound with a lot of fine wire the scraping could be a pain.
flydiver is offline  
Old 11-01-2013, 05:33 PM
  #13  
rcers
Super Contributor
 
rcers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Trophy Club TX
Posts: 6,314
Default

Originally Posted by Old 'N Slow View Post
The fumes from Aspirin - asa - acetylsalicylic acid - can in fact be very dangerous if inhaled. I wouldn't try that method.

I've dealt with the product in bulk, and during manufacture.

The fumes are hydroscopic - water-loving. The fumes - gaseous asa - will bond with water in your nasal passages, throat, lungs, etc. forming extremely corrosive, highly concentrated acid. You could loose your sense of smell, possibly forever, or burn the surfaces of your lungs. Causing them to fill with fluid.

Buy a new motor.
Again with a fan blowing the fumes away - exactly what is the danger?

I sure you hope you don't drive - that is dangerous too.

I get it as I said - NONE of the fumes from soldering are "good" for you. Thus the fan.



Have to put things in perspective, in life, IMHO.

Sad to throw away a perfectly good motor. If you are afraid of the fumes a dremel tool with a fine stone drum and or wire brush will eventually remove the coating too. Remember the factory has to do the same thing to solder - they do it just fine. Throwing away a PERFECTLY good motor is just wasteful.

Mike
rcers is offline  
Old 11-01-2013, 05:43 PM
  #14  
rcers
Super Contributor
 
rcers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Trophy Club TX
Posts: 6,314
Default

Originally Posted by flydiver View Post
You don't have to bother with aspirin. Just get an Xacto knife and scrape it. I don't personally know why people like this method. I tried it (yes, real ASA with no coating), thought it sucked.
Agree - I have had issues with the blade but the stone/wire have never failed me.

ML
rcers is offline  
Old 11-01-2013, 07:49 PM
  #15  
Old 'N Slow
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 74
Default

All the information one needs to do it safely has been provided.

Last edited by Old 'N Slow; 11-01-2013 at 11:33 PM.
Old 'N Slow is offline  
Old 11-01-2013, 09:51 PM
  #16  
rcers
Super Contributor
 
rcers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Trophy Club TX
Posts: 6,314
Default

Originally Posted by Old 'N Slow View Post
Thanks for the snarky comment.
No problem...

Originally Posted by Old 'N Slow View Post
Just trying to add a depth of information that was clearly lacking.
I thought I was pretty clear - no fumes from soldering are good. Not the stuff from rosin, solder or in this case aspirin.

I recommended a solution good for soldering something I use to disperse the fumes - a fan. It works well.

True - I don't think it is as big a deal as you. We don't have to agree do we? Isn't it great we all have our own experience base to rely on? I sure think so.

Originally Posted by Old 'N Slow View Post
You ever had a fume burn your cornea?
No I am very careful with my eyesight and protect my eyes.

Originally Posted by Old 'N Slow View Post
Got an HF acid scar on your face? I do. You don't think heat-vapourised asa fumes mixed with plastic resin fumes will do that, fan notwithstanding, you don't know what you're talking about, and have no business advising anyone that it won't happen.
No I have not. That does not mean I don't know what I am talking about.

I have 38 years of experience with soldering and in the RC hobby. You certainly don't have to take my advice but saying I don't know what I am talking about is your opinion. I have every right to post and advise - just as you do.

I think you are making a tiny issue a huge one. I have used the aspirin method it works OK. I have no issue with fumes with a vent fan. Maybe you should try rather than just dismiss and make personal attacks. By the way those are against the rules of WF.

Mike
rcers is offline  
Old 11-02-2013, 01:21 AM
  #17  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by rcers View Post
I think you are making a tiny issue a huge one.
One issue here is that some of these fumes can affect some people more than others.

As for me, if I have ANY soldering fumes in my basement workshop, even with a 10 second solder job, and even if those fumes are moved away with a fan, those fumes still affect me. I've got to move those fumes completely out of my workshop.

Guess I'm one of the 0.5% of the people that have issues with some of those fumes we deal with in this hobby.
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 11-02-2013, 01:33 AM
  #18  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by Firestem4 View Post

And does anyone have a good recommendation for a wire stripper?

Thanks!
Commercial wire varnish strippers are available, but are so expensive that they don't make sense in places other than manufacturing plants. We used them at work, and they did the job very well.

http://www.eraser.com/products/wire-...wire-stripper/ These things tend to be a lot of $$$$! I just checked, this thing goes for about $1500. About what those strippers we used at work cost.

I've used the old sharp knife trick on heavier wires, but the problem with these electric motors, they use a lot of fine stranded wires per motor phase, and every one of them has to be stripped, one at a time, all the way around the strand.

Yes, doing it is a real pain in the .

If you google magnet wire varnish remover, there are also some chemicals that will remove the varnish. That said, I wonder if common hardware store varnish remover would work? Or even paint stripper?
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 11-02-2013, 02:10 AM
  #19  
rcers
Super Contributor
 
rcers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Trophy Club TX
Posts: 6,314
Default

Wire brush on dremel tool for fine wires. Works pretty well...
rcers is offline  
Old 11-02-2013, 03:51 AM
  #20  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by rcers View Post
Wire brush on dremel tool for fine wires. Works pretty well...
Yeah
One of the wire varnish removers we used at work for wires on the order of #4 copper and heavier used a high speed wire brush type machine. This unit used a pair of wire brushes spinning inside the mechanism for removing the varnish.
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 11-06-2013, 05:19 AM
  #21  
Firestem4
inexorably eccentric
Thread Starter
 
Firestem4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: So-Cal
Posts: 256
Default

Ahh sorry, when I said wire stripper like a wire cutting that can remove the outer protective jack/insulation. I deal with Networking so occasionally a good wire cutter/stripper comes in real handy.
Firestem4 is offline  
Old 11-30-2013, 02:56 PM
  #22  
CHELLIE
Super Contributor
 
CHELLIE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Hesperia, So. Calif
Posts: 19,223
Default

Reported SPAM
CHELLIE is offline  
Old 11-30-2013, 04:21 PM
  #23  
hayofstacks
Super Contributor
 
hayofstacks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Utah
Posts: 1,780
Default

I've always just heated the bullet plug full of solder and then stuck the wire in. this has worked pretty well fir me so far. I didn't even realize there was varnish on them.
hayofstacks is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
kyleservicetech
Batteries & Chargers
18
05-16-2014 04:51 AM
kyleservicetech
Electronic Builders Workshop
9
09-03-2013 11:06 PM
electrodude71
General RC items For Sale and WTB
6
08-23-2013 07:39 PM
2006040
Brushless Motor Construction
14
10-08-2011 05:06 PM
kyleservicetech
Batteries & Chargers
5
01-08-2011 04:44 AM

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Quick Reply: Motor lead damaged, soldering an extension?


Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.

Page generated in 0.10828 seconds with 13 queries