Batteries & Chargers Discuss Li-P, Li-Ion, NiMh, Nicad battery technology and the chargers that juice 'em up!

Soldering A123 Cells

Old 08-11-2010, 09:07 PM
  #1  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
Thread Starter
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default Soldering A123 Cells

I've just purchased a total of 30 A123 cells direct from China. These were ordered without tabs and need to be soldered into place. I know, you are not supposed to directly solder these (or any types) of cells, but it works OK if done properly.

First attempts to solder with plain rosin core solder did not work well. The solder joints were typical of a cold solder joint.

Next, an 80 watt soldering iron was purchased, Weller model #SPG-80L. And some rosin soldering flux, Radio Shack # 64-022, and some 120 grit emery cloth, available from the hardware store. (Sand paper may not be a good idea, it can leave bits of abrasive on your work.) Last but not least, a squirt bottle of pure denatured alcohol, (Not the drugstore type, that is 20% water) some paper towels, and some rubber gloves to keep the flux off of your hands.

First, place a small amount of flux (about twice the area of the intended soldering spot) directly on the cell to be soldered, and scrub the flux and battery with the emery cloth for a second or two. No need to overdo it. When scrubbing the battery through the flux, apparently that flux keeps the battery surface clean before you hit it with the soldering iron.

Then using the Weller's 1/4 inch iron plated tip, very quickly place the iron and solder on the battery and "wet" the surface of the battery with a bit of rosin core solder. And, last, pre-tin your copper jumper strap, heat it up with the soldering iron til the solder melts. Then press the jumper strap with the hot soldering iron against the batteries pretinned area until the batteries' tinned area melts. Should not take more than two seconds or so. It helps to have an 1/8 inch diameter wood dowel or similar item to hold the strap down on the battery for a second or two after removing the soldering iron, to make certain the copper jumper strap does not lift off slightly.

And, after the soldering job is done, immediately wipe that soldering job clean with a piece of paper towel with alcohol on it, both to remove the soldering flux, and to cool down the soldering job on the battery.

Obviously, with pure alcohol, be careful of the fire hazard. And, use proper ventilation with the soldering fumes from the rosin flux.

I've tested these cells before and after soldering in this manner, and noted no difference in Milliampere Hour Rating, or voltage under load. Perhaps long term life might be affected, that remains to be seen.

My three 6S2P Dewalt DC9360 batteries are now in their third flying season, with some 300 Ampere Hours cycled through each of them. And they have the same exact performance as when new, in 2007.

OK, the pair of 6S2P A123 battery packs are now complete. As for soldering, I'd purchased some all purpose flux from this company. It worked far and above better than the Radio Shack flux. Don't know what this stuff is, so the cells were cleaned three times in pure alcohol after soldering, just in case!

http://www.cheapbatterypacks.com/?me...CD6B&sid=95995

Last edited by kyleservicetech; 12-15-2010 at 04:40 AM. Reason: Update for flux used in soldering
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 08-11-2010, 09:31 PM
  #2  
MaxAdventure
AMA 198798
 
MaxAdventure's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Near Mork and Mindy
Posts: 1,110
Default

Thanks for the tip. I wouldn't have thought of using the flux to shield against oxidation.

I just picked up one of these for doing battery tabs and large connectors:
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...dProduct=10803

I didn't understand the issues with overheating because of a small tip before, I'm looking forward to trying this out.
MaxAdventure is offline  
Old 08-12-2010, 01:33 AM
  #3  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
Thread Starter
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by MaxAdventure View Post
Thanks for the tip. I wouldn't have thought of using the flux to shield against oxidation.

I just picked up one of these for doing battery tabs and large connectors:
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...dProduct=10803

I didn't understand the issues with overheating because of a small tip before, I'm looking forward to trying this out.
I made one of those with some copper bar stock on my lathe some 10 years ago. Works well, and still use it. But, IMHO, that 80 watt Weller soldering iron does work better.
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 12-15-2010, 04:42 AM
  #4  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
Thread Starter
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by kyleservicetech View Post
I made one of those with some copper bar stock on my lathe some 10 years ago. Works well, and still use it. But, IMHO, that 80 watt Weller soldering iron does work better.
OK, the pair of 6S2P A123 battery packs are now complete. As for soldering, I'd purchased some all purpose flux from this company. It worked far and above better than the Radio Shack flux. Don't know what this stuff is, so the cells were cleaned three times in pure alcohol after soldering, just in case!

http://www.cheapbatterypacks.com/?menu=GF132BCD6B&sid=95995
kyleservicetech is offline  
Old 01-08-2011, 03:11 AM
  #5  
70sflyer
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Atkins Iowa
Posts: 104
Default a123 batterys

Can some one put some light on the A123 battery. is it a step up from the li-po .It it worth it.Do you receive longer flying time with less charge time.
70sflyer is offline  
Old 01-08-2011, 04:44 AM
  #6  
kyleservicetech
Super Contributor
Thread Starter
 
kyleservicetech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Posts: 8,952
Default

Originally Posted by 70sflyer View Post
Can some one put some light on the A123 battery. is it a step up from the li-po .It it worth it.Do you receive longer flying time with less charge time.
Nope, for raw ampere hours to weight ratios, Lipos have it over the A123 cells. But, A123 cells have a very long life, and have zero fire hazard. Some of the Lipos can be fast charged, but this has been true for the A123 cells since they came available.

My three 6S2P A123 packs each have over 200 flights on them, they are three years old, and have the same exact performance as when they were brand new. I'm pulling 50-60 Amperes out of them at full power.

Take a look:
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=47965
kyleservicetech is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
PMcIntire
Batteries & Chargers
17
07-21-2009 09:20 PM
constantCrash
Batteries & Chargers
3
01-21-2009 12:20 AM
JWilliams
Batteries and Chargers Forsale/WTB
11
01-14-2009 06:25 PM
MK Dave
Power Systems
2
06-26-2008 04:37 AM
dimadee
Batteries & Chargers
1
08-24-2007 03:11 AM

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Quick Reply: Soldering A123 Cells


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.

Page generated in 0.13407 seconds with 13 queries