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AeroMaster SE

Old 07-02-2012, 01:53 PM
  #1  
Birdmanpete
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Default AeroMaster SE

In the long thread "problems with Electric Drive trains" I found myself receiving a heap of good advice about converting slow flying ic oldtimers to electric flight from Mred. In the to and fro he let slip that there was one very special Biplane in his heart and that was The Aeromaster.

In Mred's memory this was even better than my Big John which is more or less from the same era (mid 1960's ish). Now I'm not sure what caught my imagination but I suddenly thought, I've got one of those. I could convert (electri-fly) it and scare myself right out of my brain.

Only problem was it was unbelievably heavy (like 3.6kg empty). I had flown it, I knew it could go with a hot 60 but I am not as young as I used to be. And that's when Mred forwarded a .pdf of the plan.

And then the lightning struck. Could this actually be a variation of one of the most sucessful aircraft of all time. First produced in 1932 and still in production in 1968, with 200 still listed as flyable today. I truly think it is.

And then I was hooked. The AeroMaster as described by Mred was a classic model. You will have to ask him about rolls loops and spins. He could write a book on that. But it was one of the best pedigreed designs in the history of aviation, The Bucker Jungmeister. I suspect that the model designers were teasing us with the clue "Master".

This is the 1930's secret "weapon" which was used to train the graduates of glider instruction in Germany at a time when potentially military aircraft had to look like playthings for the idle rich. With just 85 hp it semed innocent enough but it packed more aerobatic punch per cc than any aircraft since the forbidden Albatros DV. It remained the training aircraft of choice in Europe for generations. It was still used in that capacity in Spain in 1968.

By the time that all these pennies had dropped into place, I just had to have one. But the one in my shed weighed way too much. And that's when the plan emerged. I am going to build a 52" span version of the Aeromaster during the 26 days left of this month (July 2012) Each night I will upload pictures of the progress and just to add to the challenge the aim is to have it aerobatic strong, but slow flight light.

Time to stop writing; time to start building the Aeromaster Electro Special. And it could look a bit Meister-ish. We will see. More pictures tomorrow.
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Old 07-02-2012, 05:21 PM
  #2  
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If you want some slow flight, I recommend making the long wing version, both wings swept.

I knew the designer quite well and I also worked at the factory that built the Aeromaster.
I would be happy to provide history on the Aero if you want.
PS I also have one with an E Flite 60 that flies great.

Paul
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Old 07-02-2012, 06:05 PM
  #3  
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Originally Posted by Birdmanpete View Post
Time to stop writing; time to start building the Aeromaster Electro Special. And it could look a bit Meister-ish. We will see. More pictures tomorrow.
Would you be interested in a fiberglass fuselage for your Aeromaster Electro special?
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Old 07-02-2012, 10:46 PM
  #4  
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I liked this design so much that I built and flew 7 of them and then the Giant Aeromaster which also flew great. I found that setting them up with the upper wing at 1.5 degrees less angle of attack than the lower one made them fly great. I did a great deal of experimenting with the different degrees of difference between the upper and lower wings and found that having this set up make the most pleasant flight characteristics.
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Old 07-03-2012, 12:55 AM
  #5  
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Default Yes, Yes and more Yes.

Three great responses. Just quickly to you all. The Fibreglass fuselage is a fantastic way to go but I am now committed to the balsa. The history of the model design is fabulous, feel free to climb aboard with that. And the decalage differential is really important in biplanes especially when the wings are not equi distant above and below the thrust line. The higher thhe upper wing the more significant the drag becomes and that's where the reduced angle of attack is well worth the effort. I have not actually measured the plan. I'd be surprised if they were parallel but I will check. I made a start last night. Will show and tell later.

Best wishes
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Old 07-03-2012, 01:53 AM
  #6  
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My dad was friends with Lou Andrews while he worked for Guillows.
When he left Guillow's he started his own company Andrews aircraft model company, Aamco for short.
The first two planes he produced were the S-ray and the high wing version the H-ray. A couple of others were to follow using most of the parts. They were the L-ray ( low wing) and the Bi-ray.

Biplanes in the early 60's were floaty things that actually didn't do well for aerobatics.

A friend of ours, Peter"Duke" Zakoian built a Bolero biplane. the Bolero flew different from any earlier bipe. It was fast and maneuverable, it flew the same as a low wing plane of that era.

Dukes friend Ernie Huber like the way the Bolero flew and tried to get Lou to build a full sized full house biplane that would perform as well or better than the Bolero. Ernie suceeded and Lou dropped the idea of a Bi-ray.

About the same time my dad was building a Curtiss Falcon biplane.
Lou incorporated ideas from all the biplanes to make the Aeromaster.
The top wing was the same size and sweep as the Curtiss, the tail looked similar too. The fuselage took ideas from the Bucker Jungmeister and Lou blended it all together with his own magic.

As soon as the penciled plans were far enough along Lou and Ernie started building the first two Aeromasters while Bill Harney did the inking of the final plans.

Ernie finished his first and flew a demonstration flight at the 1966 Nationals.
A lot of people were very impressed.
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Lou's airplane was finished and serious testing took place. The incidence of both the top wing and the bottom wing were experimented with along with different engines and CG locations.
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There was not enough difference in the incidence changes to warrant changing the now finished plans. The wings were parallel, and that's the way the production planes were.

The original wing sizes were top and bottom wings 48 inch wing span.
Both Lou and Ernie had the newest proportional radios. Their planes flew great with the small wings.

My dad built one of the first production ones and changed the top wing to 52 inch wing span and the bottom wing left stock.
This one had a better glide and would carry the older heavier radio equipment a little better. Drawback was it had a slower roll rate than the original.
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The next one built had both top and bottom wings swept back and ailerons on the top wing too. Both of the wings were extended to 52 inches. This had very nice flying characteristics and a very fast roll rate.
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I had started working at Aamco part time while I was in school and did odd jobs. Translated: anything that a teenager couldn't mess up.
By 1971 I was running the workshop and building some planes for Lou.

I built an Aeromaster with both wings swept and dual ailerons so he could evaluate the difference. As I finished the wings he asked me to change the tail to look like a Jungmeister, I did and here's a picture.
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The Jungmeister was too much of a change to incorporate in the current kit, but a new plan sheet was added so the longer swept top and bottom wings could be built from the kit. this was the Aeromaster Too.

I don't know how many Aeromasters I've built but I've made quite a few changes to make the plane look or act just a little different.
Here's a couple.
My build thread on electrifying an Aeromaster: http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/show...ric+aeromaster

Here's the latest incarnation a larger tailed Super Aeromonster.
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:18 AM
  #7  
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PD1 that is a massive contribution. Truly worth your efforts and great pictures. So we all know it is a great flier but are any of them currently running as electrics?

I have looked at my pdf file and I think I see the leading edge of the lower wing "up" relative to the upper wing by 4.5mm. Using pencil and protractor on an enlarged paper print that comes very close to 1.5 degres positive on the lower wing while the upper wing axis appears neutral as it is parallel to the axis of the tailplane. The true thrust line (axis of crankshaft) is also parallel to that, suggesting no down thrust on the motor. That interests me as the crank shaft is about 30mm below the interplane midpoint. I am pretty sure I will be going for a degree of downthrust but it is early days yet. BMP.
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:49 AM
  #8  
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The wings are parallel to the box loc foundation.
Both wings are set at Zero. The engine is also set at zero.

The stabilizer, however, has a positive incidence angle.
I forget how many degrees, but the leading edge is about 1/8 inch higher than the trailing edge. That does change things.

I have forgotten if raising the trailing edge of the top wing helped, it might have.
With rubber bands holding the wings on, it was very easy to slide a Popsicle stick under the trailing edge.

I have a link to my build thread in my last post. But I still have an electric Aeromaster, althogh it's in need of a small repair.
It will fly again this fall, I'm changing the color of the fuselage so I can see it better.
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:04 AM
  #9  
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Well, I found ya. Glad to hear that you are getting a start on this great plane. While I think this is one of the great flying bi-planes of all time, it is a close race between this and the Pulsair bipe. I loved both of them, but since the Pulsair bipe is a fiberglass fuselage and foam wings, there are no plans for it and you just can't build one from scratch like this one. Since I can't build the other, I will just have to stay with my first love and the Aeromaster can't really be beat for all out flying fun and handling. I just wish I had a kit to make things easier. The part that has me worried the most is getting the cabanes right. That box lock makes it a little harder to build too, but I have a router that should fix that.

When I first saw the Giant Aeromaster I was going to buy one until I saw a good picture of it. That to me is just not an Aeromaster. They changed the lines to much and while they may call it anything they want, to me it is not an Aeromaster. I had thought about building a blown-up version of the Aeromaster, but the motor and batteries just get to be a bit much for me right now, so a standard size is going on my table pretty soon.

pd1. I love what you did to the nose on yours and as soon as I saw it I thought of the P-6E even without the picture. It just looked close enough that it fit that nose. Great looking plane and I love the color scheme you put on it. It looks fantastic.

Ed
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Old 07-03-2012, 11:50 AM
  #10  
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Hi Ed, The box locs were cut using a table saw. We used Dado blades, but multiple passes over a single blade will get the same results. Making them is much easier than thinking about making them.

K&S makes a good wire bender. The cabanes aren't that hard to bend either if you use a bender and set some jigs on the workbench for stops to control the leg lengths.

Glad you liked the P-6E look to the Aeromaster, I liked it too, well I liked it until I flew past a stand of trees and it disappeared. That's why I'm repairing it.
Who knew that green would act like camouflage?

Paul
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Old 07-03-2012, 02:54 PM
  #11  
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Default Day 2. Aeromaster ES

Forgive me it has been a long day. Last night the project was where to start and for me it was with the aft turtle deck. The character of this design in style is with that cute little hump back. I had to start with the hump back and it didn't quite go right. If you look at the Aeromaster and the Bucker closely the spine swells at former B. Mine doesn't swell quite enough as the picture shows but I will fix it.

Last night I drew the formers from the pdf file. Not as simple as I thought.

And with that done, tonight was supposed to be easy with the assembly onto a crutch plate which will eventually go from nose to tail. And if your eye is half way straight you will se the problem between formers A&B.

In the average model that would disappear in the paint job. In my case it will be on show for ever because I will be using translucent film. But I am still quite happy with the progress. From where I sit the hardest has been done.

What I should have said last night was my plan for the weight.

I will be very happy if I can get the weight of the complete airframe (less drive train) below 4 pounds. I will be ecstatic if it gets close to 3 pounds. That's because I am no longer young enough to look forward to guiding a 7 pound (AUW) missile. I don't know for sure but my guess is that the Jungmeister was around 7 to 8 metre span. That puts my 52 inch replica somewhere near 5th scale. So I would like it to have a circuit speed somewhere near 10 knots. I put it to you that that is pretty ambitious.

And this is where I need you to do some number crunching. If I can build it under four pounds what do you reckon I should do to drive it for ten minutes between recharges with a mild aerobatic ability. What motor, what battery?

And in the meantime, what stunts have you pulled with an AeroMaster? I have heard a few which see my blood running cold. The lack of dihedral and the zero rigging angles suggest that this is a real goer. But did you try ailerons on both wings? And what size servos? Could you hold knife edge?. If so, how big was the rudder? I really need to know.

And what was your most memorable moment with an AeroMaster?

An old Aussie depends on you.

Best wishes BMP
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Old 07-03-2012, 06:32 PM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by pd1 View Post
Hi Ed, The box locs were cut using a table saw. We used Dado blades, but multiple passes over a single blade will get the same results. Making them is much easier than thinking about making them.

K&S makes a good wire bender. The cabanes aren't that hard to bend either if you use a bender and set some jigs on the workbench for stops to control the leg lengths.

Glad you liked the P-6E look to the Aeromaster, I liked it too, well I liked it until I flew past a stand of trees and it disappeared. That's why I'm repairing it.
Who knew that green would act like camouflage?

Paul
I did. I painted a plane Met. Green once and while it looked great, it was hard to see with the trees in the background. I guess you weren't the only one to make that mistake.

I have a table saw with a dado blade and also a table router. I think either one would work for those cuts. As for making the cabanes, I have a wire bender and have had several over the years, but for some reason I have a hard time getting each side to match. If I could ever get a left and right matching set, I would be thrilled. I have some wire on order and as soon as I get it, I am going to start bending. Sooner or later I will get two that match and then it is a simple matter of making them either a right or left. I just wish I had the foresight to buy 10 kits when they were in production, but I never knew the ARFs would take over like this. If I had seen this coming, I would have stocked up on my favorite kits so I would never run out.

Ed
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Old 07-03-2012, 07:07 PM
  #13  
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Ed, the Aeromaster comes up on that famous auction site quite frequently. The going prices are about $150 for an original Aamco kit and $175 and above for the Super Aeromaster by Great Planes.

I used to bend the wire for the Aeros at the factory. The secret is to start at the top inside the cabane bend, then the outer legs and the bent over legs.
All the bends are equal length front to rear and left to right.
The last bend is the angle on the struts that splay the struts outward.

All the wire lengths are set by having the end of the wire against a fixed block then bending the radius.
If you want I can try to make a drawing showing how they are done.

I have a spare kit on my shelf now too, just in case.

Paul
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Old 07-03-2012, 07:25 PM
  #14  
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bmp,
Here are a couple pictures of my electric Aeromaster with 4 ailerons.
It's fun, but not needed with the new modern servos. Today's servos are much faster than the old ones.

Both wings swept and 52 inch span only the bottom wing needs ailerons.
I used Futaba 3004 servos, one for each aileron on the Aeromonster and Spektrum DS 821 digital servo, one for two ailerons with belcranks for my electric Aero.

The Aeromaster will hold knife edge fine with the stock rudder. With the larger rudder it will easily climb in knife edge and do the first half of a loop sideways.
Too chicken to try the bottom half of a knife edge loop.

If you can think of a maneuver, the Aero can do it, sometimes not pretty, but I think that's just me.

Upright snap rolls and inverted snap rolls are very easy and tight with the larger tail surfaces. Snap rolling 20 feet up is easy because the plane doesn't drop.

I went crazy trying to reduce the weight on my electric Aeromaster. I don't think that was needed. When I was experimenting with batteries, the weight would change by over a pound and the plane still flew well.
But I agree, lighter is better.

The Aero will hover with power, but flying on the wing at 10 knots is a tough sell.
While not overly fast, the Aero flies like other similar sized pattern/ sport planes.
I have an extra rudder downstairs, I'll see if I can trace it and the larger stabilizer too.
Tonight.

Most memorable moment was flying in a race against a friend with a Mustang with retracts and a tuned pipe...and winning.
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Old 07-03-2012, 08:15 PM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by Birdmanpete View Post
Forgive me it has been a long day. Last night the project was where to start and for me it was with the aft turtle deck. The character of this design in style is with that cute little hump back. I had to start with the hump back and it didn't quite go right. If you look at the Aeromaster and the Bucker closely the spine swells at former B. Mine doesn't swell quite enough as the picture shows but I will fix it.

Last night I drew the formers from the pdf file. Not as simple as I thought.

I use the patterns from the plans to make the formers and they seem to come out pretty close for me. Just cut the patterns out and lay it on the balsa and cut them out. They should come out close enough that you have that nice curve in there.

And with that done, tonight was supposed to be easy with the assembly onto a crutch plate which will eventually go from nose to tail. And if your eye is half way straight you will see the problem between formers A&B.

In the average model that would disappear in the paint job. In my case it will be on show for ever because I will be using translucent film. But I am still quite happy with the progress. From where I sit the hardest has been done.

What I should have said last night was my plan for the weight.

I will be very happy if I can get the weight of the complete airframe (less drive train) below 4 pounds. I will be ecstatic if it gets close to 3 pounds. That's because I am no longer young enough to look forward to guiding a 7 pound (AUW) missile. I don't know for sure but my guess is that the Jungmeister was around 7 to 8 metre span. That puts my 52 inch replica somewhere near 5th scale. So I would like it to have a circuit speed somewhere near 10 knots. I put it to you that that is pretty ambitious.

I see no reason why you can't hit 4 pounds or less if you watch the weight of the balsa and cut some lightening holes where you can. You also need to watch the glue you use as this can add up faster then you think. I think ready to fly weight, less the equipment, it is possible to get a 4 pound plane and they fly better when they are lighter. A 7 pound bi-plane would not be all that outrages, but it will fly better at less weight.

And this is where I need you to do some number crunching. If I can build it under four pounds what do you reckon I should do to drive it for ten minutes between recharges with a mild aerobatic ability. What motor, what battery?

I would use an electric motor that is at least equal to a 60. That should give you enough power to fly vertical without losing airspeed so fast and falling out of something like a top hat or figure M where you need plenty of power. With good throttle management you could probably get by with about a 5 or 6000MAh battery. That will give you about 7 to 10 minuets flying IF you are not flying at full throttle all the time.

And in the meantime, what stunts have you pulled with an AeroMaster? I have heard a few which see my blood running cold. The lack of dihedral and the zero rigging angles suggest that this is a real goer. But did you try ailerons on both wings? And what size servos? Could you hold knife edge?. If so, how big was the rudder? I really need to know.

The Aeromaster is capable of anything you are capable of doing short of 3D type stunts. It can do the AMA pattern if it is light and you know how to do it. A heavy plane will just mush through it and it won't look as good, but it can still do them. Keep it under 6 pounds total weight and you will have a fantastic flying plane. I'm not sure what you mean by a 10 knot circuit speed, but I don't think you are going to get that slow. At a guess, mine flew at about 60mph and that is kind of slow. I know it is no where near the fast pattern planes they started flying. You can't take a scale and say this is the scale speed for a model. It just doesn't work that way. It would be nice to have a slow speed for a scale plane, but they just don't come out that way.

And what was your most memorable moment with an AeroMaster?

Just flying the thing. It is beyond wild and to say this is a fantastic flying plane is an understatement. This thing does crazy snaps and the best spin I have ever seen on any model. It is also a very easy plane to fly and almost a trainer, but you can really get wild with it if you care to.

An old Aussie depends on you.

Best wishes BMP
I think I answered all your questions, but if I left anything out, let me know and I will try to answer them a little better.

Ed
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Old 07-03-2012, 08:36 PM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by pd1 View Post
Ed, the Aeromaster comes up on that famous auction site quite frequently. The going prices are about $150 for an original Aamco kit and $175 and above for the Super Aeromaster by Great Planes.

I used to bend the wire for the Aeros at the factory. The secret is to start at the top inside the cabane bend, then the outer legs and the bent over legs.
All the bends are equal length front to rear and left to right.
The last bend is the angle on the struts that splay the struts outward.

All the wire lengths are set by having the end of the wire against a fixed block then bending the radius.
If you want I can try to make a drawing showing how they are done.

I have a spare kit on my shelf now too, just in case.

Paul
So far I have only seen one Aeromaster come up for auction and that one went for $200.00 if I remember right. I tried to bid on it, but they went higher then I felt like going then. I guess if I look more often I may fine another one, but I don't check it that often.

As for bending the wires, I seem to have a little problem getting them both the same length after I bend them. That makes for a lopsided wing. I haven't tried this one yet, but I did another bi-plane and I had to bend about 6 wires before I get two that I was happy with. Any help with pictures would be greatly appreciated. I never turn down help, especially if it comes from someone that worked at the factory.

Ed
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Old 07-03-2012, 11:00 PM
  #17  
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BMP, I scanned a spare rudder I had and traced over it to give you a plan to build on.
I also drew the new stab tips onto a stabilizer drawing.

The rudder will be too tall to fit the fin as is. I extended the fin upwards the same way I did the stab tips.

The PDF files should print out full sized. Let me know if they don't. I added a vertical dimension to help with checking the rudder size.
Sometimes my computer doesn't get along with the wattflyer computer.

Paul
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Old 07-03-2012, 11:04 PM
  #18  
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ED,
I'll see what I can do about setting up a wire bending jig and taking pictures, possibly tomorrow.
Paul
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Old 07-04-2012, 12:43 AM
  #19  
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You guys are taking great care of me but please don't stop. Listening to the two of you lamenting the loss of a production kit makes me wonder whether with your skills, or perhaps with your club's skills you would consider producing a Kit which had a lot of the Aeromaster style. I think Pd1 would be great in the bird cage department doing the cabanes and cart.
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Old 07-04-2012, 01:59 AM
  #20  
mred
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Originally Posted by Birdmanpete View Post
You guys are taking great care of me but please don't stop. Listening to the two of you lamenting the loss of a production kit makes me wonder whether with your skills, or perhaps with your club's skills you would consider producing a Kit which had a lot of the Aeromaster style. I think Pd1 would be great in the bird cage department doing the cabanes and cart.
Yea, but the problem is, he is way up north near Boston and I am way down south in Georgia. I am more then happy to give what little help I can give, but I think doing a kit for selling would be a loss these days. Unless you had a laser cutting business with a bunch of business, it would never pay off to get even, let alone make a profit. I wish I had a kit, because I used to be able to put one together in a couple of weeks. Now it takes me a little longer and I have all the time in the world to build after retiring. Can't seen to figure that one out. I'm gonna try bending some coat hangers to see if I can get close on the cabanes and save my music wire for the real thing. Coat hangers are cheap and easy to bend. Maybe I can figure out how to do it right on the music wire that way.

Ed
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Old 07-04-2012, 02:14 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by pd1 View Post
BMP, I scanned a spare rudder I had and traced over it to give you a plan to build on.
I also drew the new stab tips onto a stabilizer drawing.

The rudder will be too tall to fit the fin as is. I extended the fin upwards the same way I did the stab tips.

The PDF files should print out full sized. Let me know if they don't. I added a vertical dimension to help with checking the rudder size.
Sometimes my computer doesn't get along with the wattflyer computer.

Paul
What's the advantage of the bigger stab and elevator? I can understand the rudder, but I never had any problems with the stab and elevator on any of mine that I noticed. While I couldn't climb into a knife edge loop with mine, I never really had the urge to.

With the new double and triple rates on the new radios, you could set up some really wild travel on the controls to pretty much give you that on the stock surfaces I think. My rudder was always a little touchy anyway, but the elevator was great just where it was and the ailerons were just about right for me. I think you would have a much better setup with two servos in the wing for ailerons rather then just the one and using belcranks like the stock one. I never did really like them. I always worried about flutter using them. I had a problem with that in my Orion and just never liked belcranks since then.

Ed
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Old 07-04-2012, 03:25 AM
  #22  
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Hi Ed, if you look at the picture of the one with the red underside of the wing, you'll see that there is indeed two aileron servos.

That was just one more of the improvements in the last Aeromaster.

The tail in the kit was sized for the shorter wings. It works OK for the longer wings but enlarging the stab and elevator gives much more elevator authority at slow speeds and stability in most of the flight range.
You can now make the wings stall before the tail.

Another advantage is you don't need as much throw to make the plane go crazy.
You can leave the pushrod on the outer hole of the control horn and have maximum mechanical advantage. Less likelihood of flutter.

My electric Aero still has the stock tail, I'm changing that in the rebuild, there is that much of a difference.

Paul
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Old 07-04-2012, 01:40 PM
  #23  
Birdmanpete
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I had quite a busy time of it last night and it is taking shape even though you might not think it because it only weighs 2 ounces. Tomorrow will see the tail plane and maybe the fin and rudder. I am not quite sure whether to mount the tailplane with glue or elastic bands. I like the capacity to fit more than five aircraft in the back of the car. But this is no monster and it probaly will be glue.

I am going to use the big tail feathers because I want as much area as possible but I think I prefer the original in terms of eyeball appeal. If I was into maxi aerobatics I would probably stick with the original full stop. It must roll like a Dervish.

I am really keen to hear about motors, props and battery combinations. I am thinking of "60 size" but that's a big field and if you have a favourite please do tell.

When I said last night that I wanted a ten knot circuit sped I was exaggerating but the idea of leisurely aerobatics is much more appealing than busy ones and a nice slow flare out is a big bonus when flying from grass which is a long way from Kentucky bowling greens.
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Old 07-04-2012, 08:56 PM
  #24  
mred
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If you keep building like this, you are going to beat all records as the light weight on this plane. Just don't forget the add enough strength to make it stand up to the riggers of the "G" forces this plane can dish out. I would add some angle bracing to that framework to stiffen it up some.

As for a motor, I think 800 to 1,000 watts should pull this nicely and still give you a slow and easy flight simply be throttling back. Sort of a 3D motor, but not using it like that most of the time. Just when you want to go vertical farther then a normal person normally would. I like insane power at iems, but most of the time I just throttle back and relax.

A good 4S or 5S 5,000MAh battery should work out pretty good depending on motor. You sort of have to pick the motor before you decide on the battery, but the capacity I think should be around 5,000MAh for a decent long flight. Props is another thing you will have to have the motor for before you worry about props. One motor will turn a different prop then another, so settle on the motor first and then we can go from there on everything else.

You don't always need a smooth low cut grass to fly from it if you use a bigger wheel. Anything like a 3" to 3.5" wheel should work out pretty good for grass flying. Just try and keep the grass somewhat short. I'd still like to know what a dervish is.............. Is that anything like a Tasmanian devil

Ed
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Old 07-04-2012, 09:25 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by pd1 View Post
Hi Ed, if you look at the picture of the one with the red underside of the wing, you'll see that there is indeed two aileron servos.

That was just one more of the improvements in the last Aeromaster.

The tail in the kit was sized for the shorter wings. It works OK for the longer wings but enlarging the stab and elevator gives much more elevator authority at slow speeds and stability in most of the flight range.
You can now make the wings stall before the tail.

Another advantage is you don't need as much throw to make the plane go crazy.
You can leave the pushrod on the outer hole of the control horn and have maximum mechanical advantage. Less likelihood of flutter.

My electric Aero still has the stock tail, I'm changing that in the rebuild, there is that much of a difference.

Paul
Well, if there is that much difference, then I may just have to try it once to see. I'm not to wild about that new rudder though. Just something about the shape that doesn't hit me right.

On the wires, nothing is called out on the plans for size. I looked and it looks like the cabanes are 1/8" and the bracing is 3/32". Is that right? The landing gear seems to be the same with 1/8" legs and the brace is 3/32". Hope I got that right, since that is the size wire I bought. I did forget to add the wrapping wire to the order, so I guess I will need to get some of that too. I'll look at the hardware stores and see what they have. Is copper wire good enough for wrapping this along with silver solder??

Ed

Last edited by mred; 07-04-2012 at 11:50 PM.
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