Brushless Motor Construction Discuss design and construction of custom Brushless motors

Soldering motor leads

Old 06-07-2012, 04:19 PM
  #1  
mofosheee
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Default Soldering motor leads

I encountered difficulties when attempting to solder the shortened leads between the motor and ESC. Specifically, the solder would not bond to the shortened motor leads.

I believe that this is due to a coating that exists on the motor leads.

Can somebody suggest an effective method of removing this coating or applying solder?

Thanks all
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Old 06-07-2012, 04:51 PM
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flydiver
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If the wire is kinda stiff, that means they've extended the winding wire out. It is coated with a pretty tough insulation. Physically scrape it off with an exacto blade. Then flux + solder should stick.
FWIW that kind of wire is more subject to breaking by flex if it is worked at all. Depending on your application it may be more worthwhile to shorten the leads and solder flexible silicone wire to them, then the bullets.
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Old 06-07-2012, 11:05 PM
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Bub Steve
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Take a aspirin pill( Not Bayer kind) and put it down on soldering table ,, put the wire on top and then your iron on that, hold until aspirin starts to boil for a 3-5 sec's, clean with 90+ Rubbing alcohol , solder as usual,, bubsteve
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Old 06-07-2012, 11:22 PM
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ron_van_sommeren
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Aspirin® = Bayer AG Steve.

A brand name that became a generic name.

Any acetylsalicylic acid based painkiller will do the trick. Not ibuprofen, paracetemol etc.


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Last edited by ron_van_sommeren; 06-08-2012 at 01:17 PM.
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Old 06-08-2012, 05:44 PM
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Bub Steve
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Originally Posted by ron_van_sommeren View Post
Aspirin® = Bayer AG Steve.

A brand name that became a generic name.

Any acetylsalicylic acid based painkiller will do the trick. Not ibuprofen, paracetemol etc.


Vriendelijke groeten Ron
• diy motor tips • Drive Calculator •
• diy motor group • Cumulus MFC •
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I think it was you who told me years ago about this,, Been a long time since I've heard from you,, Knowing your still around has made my Day,,, I've noticed the Bayer has a different make-up that makes it dissolve faster in water and "coats" a tad of slime after that takes a min more to clean,,no biggie though, Thanks again my Bub for you always insightful comments bubsteve
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Old 06-08-2012, 06:03 PM
  #6  
kyleservicetech
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Originally Posted by mofosheee View Post
I encountered difficulties when attempting to solder the shortened leads between the motor and ESC. Specifically, the solder would not bond to the shortened motor leads.

I believe that this is due to a coating that exists on the motor leads.

Can somebody suggest an effective method of removing this coating or applying solder?

Thanks all
Hello again!!!
Before retiring the shop used commercial hand held devices designed to remove the varnish coating from magnet wire. Problem was, these things were way over $500 each. New units can cost $1500.

Removing varnish from magnet wire is not easy, even with an exacto knife blade. (Done it many many times) Problem with the exacto knife removal process is the very high risk of nicking the soft copper wire strands. Those nicks result in point of failure if the wire is flexed back and forth a little bit.

One of these days must try that asprin pill method.

There are also chemical magnet wire varnish removers available. However they are not cheap:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1NtxCFOdFs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0CnP...feature=relmfu

Guess the bottom line is, to NEVER cut those multistrand varnish coated copper wire leads from the brushless motors we use, unless you have access to commerical wire stripping equipment.

(Before retiring, the shop bought magnet wire in all sizes from #36 to 4/0. Some of those rolls weighed in at over 400 pounds. And, a lot of heavy gauge flat sheet copper also. Those "End of spool" sources of magnet wire were sure handy for home projects.)

Last edited by kyleservicetech; 06-08-2012 at 06:27 PM.
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Old 06-08-2012, 06:55 PM
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JetPlaneFlyer
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Originally Posted by kyleservicetech View Post
Guess the bottom line is, to NEVER cut those multistrand varnish coated copper wire leads from the brushless motors we use, unless you have access to commerical wire stripping equipment.
That's the best advice.. DON'T DO IT!

Guess it's a bit late if you have cut the wires but you might have to scrap the motor and put it down to experience. Try the Asprin method by all means though.. lets know if it works.

Steve
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Old 06-08-2012, 07:23 PM
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Jeez, don't these motor companies just use the wire where the coating turns into flux?

Anyway, I tend to hit the wire with a lighter or heat gun then gently sand with 500 grit.
Not sure if there is room with what's left sticking out, though.
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Old 06-08-2012, 09:00 PM
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Originally Posted by CNY_Dave View Post
Jeez, don't these motor companies just use the wire where the coating turns into flux?

Anyway, I tend to hit the wire with a lighter or heat gun then gently sand with 500 grit.
Not sure if there is room with what's left sticking out, though.
That's ok for thick single strand wire (or maybe up to 4 strands or so) but for the very fine filament multi strand windings on most factory wound motors I've never had much luck. Even if you think you have a good joint there are likely to be some of the stands not soldered and so not carrying any current.
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Old 06-08-2012, 09:17 PM
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How about lasers?

http://www.microjoining.com/Publishe...plications.pdf
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Old 06-08-2012, 09:26 PM
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Looks like they even use wire and fiberglass rotating brushes, too.

Dave
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Old 06-09-2012, 03:29 AM
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kyleservicetech
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Originally Posted by CNY_Dave View Post
Jeez, don't these motor companies just use the wire where the coating turns into flux?

Anyway, I tend to hit the wire with a lighter or heat gun then gently sand with 500 grit.
Not sure if there is room with what's left sticking out, though.
Those varnish coatings that can be soldered may not work very well in electric motor windings. Would hate to see the motor run a little bit to hot, and have all the varnish of the windings melt away

Before retiring, we used "Double Formvar" varnish coated magnet wire. This wire is rated for pretty high temperatures. That stuff was really hard to get off the copper wire. About all that worked very well was those commercial duty $1500 wire strippers.
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Old 06-09-2012, 09:54 AM
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Originally Posted by kyleservicetech View Post
Those varnish coatings that can be soldered may not work very well in electric motor windings. Would hate to see the motor run a little bit to hot, and have all the varnish of the windings melt away

Before retiring, we used "Double Formvar" varnish coated magnet wire. This wire is rated for pretty high temperatures. That stuff was really hard to get off the copper wire. About all that worked very well was those commercial duty $1500 wire strippers.
I think that is the coating that we get today on the better quality magnet wire. The stuff I have definitely says something about being double coated; probably explains why it's such a pain to remove.
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Old 06-18-2012, 07:26 PM
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ron_van_sommeren
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Originally Posted by kyleservicetech View Post
... One of these days must try that asprin pill method. ...
Nasty acrid fumes Deny

I've also read about people using a rotating wire brush in a Dremel to remove the varnish.

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Old 06-18-2012, 08:25 PM
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Looks like I'm screwed. When acetone did not work I knew something was up.
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Old 06-19-2012, 02:15 AM
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Originally Posted by ron_van_sommeren View Post
Nasty acrid fumes Deny

I've also read about people using a rotating wire brush in a Dremel to remove the varnish.

Vriendelijke groeten Ron
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Yup, that's why I've got a powerful exhaust fan that sucks up all the fumes, and blows them outside of the house. After working with a soldering iron near 50 years, got allergic to soldering fumes.

I've tried that tiny wire brush in a dremel to remove insulation. It works fairly OK, but with the multistrand magnet wire in the Hacker and similar motors, its difficult to do a real good job on all of the strands.
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