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View Poll Results: What are these leads called?
Female to Female
36.84%
Male to Male
63.16%
Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-09-2014, 07:00 AM
  #1  
Nitro Blast
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Ok Wattheads...

WHAT ARE THESE?





A) They are FEMALE to FEMALE leads
(because they have female ends)

B) They are MALE TO MALE leads
(because they connect 2 male leads)
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Old 08-09-2014, 07:04 AM
  #2  
JoshW
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B, but with a correction: they are male to male because they connect female to female.

http://www.amazon.com/Generic-Extens...o+male+to+male

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Old 08-09-2014, 07:37 AM
  #3  
pizzano
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There Trans-gender plugs......
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Old 08-09-2014, 01:40 PM
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Don Sims
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Look male to male but need to see the ends... are they outsiders or insiders?
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Old 08-09-2014, 03:11 PM
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Stevephoon
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Looks like the ones that are on a servo to me. And those are considered Male.

http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...SM&C=MHA&V=EMO

The exact opposite of EC3 and some other power connectors.... go figure.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...VV605WSYB3NPH6



Steve
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Old 08-09-2014, 05:11 PM
  #6  
Wrongway-Feldman
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Electrical Industry standards on all cables with plugs on both ends of a cable is to name the connectors on said cable in the descriptor.
The "to" in the descriptor describes the connection of the wire lead between the two plugs and not what the assembled wire and plugs will connect to.
In other words, an assembly with a female plug on one end and a male on the other is a female "to" male connector.
The assembly pictured by the OP appears to have two male ends therefore it is classified as a male to male connector.
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Old 08-09-2014, 05:25 PM
  #7  
Wrongway-Feldman
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Originally Posted by Don Sims View Post
Look male to male but need to see the ends... are they outsiders or insiders?
You are correct. They are male ends.
Some people get confused by this type of connector due to the fact that the connection is made by a pin inserted in to the end of the plug. But in this case that does not make it a female connector.
The determining factor for male or female designation is the plug housing itself.
A male plug housing is designed to be inserted as a whole in to a receptical housing. The actual method of signal transfer inside the plug are not a factor.
In the case of servo connectors the male end of the plug has holes in the end that the female end inserts pins into. But the male plug is designed to fit inside the outer shell of the female plug, like you find at one end of a servo extender.
The confusion comes from many female connectors on receivers and the like no longer have the physical plug end and only have the exposed pins.
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Old 08-09-2014, 05:56 PM
  #8  
kyleservicetech
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Originally Posted by Wrongway-Feldman View Post
You are correct. They are male ends.
Some people get confused by this type of connector due to the fact that the connection is made by a pin inserted in to the end of the plug. But in this case that does not make it a female connector.
The determining factor for male or female designation is the plug housing itself.
A male plug housing is designed to be inserted as a whole in to a receptical housing. The actual method of signal transfer inside the plug are not a factor.
In the case of servo connectors the male end of the plug has holes in the end that the female end inserts pins into. But the male plug is designed to fit inside the outer shell of the female plug, like you find at one end of a servo extender.
The confusion comes from many female connectors on receivers and the like no longer have the physical plug end and only have the exposed pins.
Yeah
On our radio equipment, the plastic shell defines whether its "Male" or "Female" connectors. The internal pin structure is not relevant.

On the other hand, before retiring at work, that did not apply. We had $$$$ custom made outdoor class connectors with aluminum male shells, that used both male and female pins. That made it possible to connect matching male-female aluminum housings together, where both aluminum housings had male pins inside.

In fact, some of them had a removable pin structure in the aluminum housing that made it possible to exchange a male pin structure with a female pin structure in the same aluminum male housing.

You'd better believe that made a real mess when the customer wanted to place an order for a new $800.00 plus cable for some equipment that was a few years old.
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Old 08-10-2014, 06:17 AM
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Well, how this came about is kind of a funny story.... I was at the field, and needed one. I asked my buddy Josh (JoshW) if he had a female to female servo lead... he rummaged in his box, and said no. A few seconds later, I looked at his tray, and said "You have one right here!" He replied " No, thats female to female" and the debate began....

Alas, I was clearly misunderstanding what they were called and he still won't let me live it down! Although he did give it to me and I could fly my S-800 with the retracts working that day...
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Old 08-10-2014, 09:30 AM
  #10  
CHELLIE
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Originally Posted by pizzano View Post
There Trans-gender plugs......
Thats Funny
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Old 08-10-2014, 09:59 AM
  #11  
JetPlaneFlyer
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Originally Posted by Nitro Blast View Post
Well, how this came about is kind of a funny story.... I was at the field, and needed one. I asked my buddy Josh (JoshW) if he had a female to female servo lead... he rummaged in his box, and said no. A few seconds later, I looked at his tray, and said "You have one right here!" He replied " No, thats female to female" and the debate began....

Alas, I was clearly misunderstanding what they were called and he still won't let me live it down! Although he did give it to me and I could fly my S-800 with the retracts working that day...
I'm with Josh, I consider those female connectors because the actual connectors are female, they receive the male pin.

Regarding those advocating taking gender off the housing. Here's one for you to ponder;
What if the adjoining connector was just male pins, with no housing (as is sometimes the case on lightweight receivers?). Clearly if the Rx just had male pins and no housing then it's a male connector... yes?. If the plug in the photo is also male how come it will connect to it? Would the connector swap gender in that instance?

But I accept, there is more than one way to look at it.
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Old 08-10-2014, 03:54 PM
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Wrongway-Feldman
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Originally Posted by JetPlaneFlyer View Post
I'm with Josh, I consider those female connectors because the actual connectors are female, they receive the male pin.

Regarding those advocating taking gender off the housing. Here's one for you to ponder;
What if the adjoining connector was just male pins, with no housing (as is sometimes the case on lightweight receivers?). Clearly if the Rx just had male pins and no housing then it's a male connector... yes?. If the plug in the photo is also male how come it will connect to it? Would the connector swap gender in that instance?

But I accept, there is more than one way to look at it.
As far as connectors with just the pins exposed, as you mentioned on a rx or the like, it is still classified under industry convention as if the original plug housing was still intact.

Here's another thing to ponder. Ec3 connectors have bullet plugs inside a plastic housing. The male bullet connectors are in a plug housing that is female. The RC industry calls that connector a male connector while the rest of the electrical community knows it to be a female connector. When I started up with electrics this caused me to purchase a number of the wrong plugs.
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Old 08-10-2014, 03:59 PM
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Turbojoe
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Originally Posted by pizzano View Post
There Trans-gender plugs......
LMAO! Coffee spew all over monitor and keyboard.

Joe
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Old 08-10-2014, 04:17 PM
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Wrongway-Feldman
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Originally Posted by Turbojoe View Post
LMAO! Coffee spew all over monitor and keyboard.

Joe
I guess that makes anderson power poles bi-gendered.
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Old 08-11-2014, 12:08 AM
  #15  
JetPlaneFlyer
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Originally Posted by Wrongway-Feldman View Post
As far as connectors with just the pins exposed, as you mentioned on a rx or the like, it is still classified under industry convention as if the original plug housing was still intact.
If it's industry convention I think it's illogical and confusing as the example I quoted illustrates. A convention that results in having to 'imagine' a male connector has a female housing (when in reality it has no housing) and thus on the grounds of it's imaginary female housing our male pin connector can be considered female, is quite obviously nuts.

If you go by the actual connecting pins there is no ambiguity or confusion.
Male pin = male connector
Female socket = female connector.

Cant be much simpler, even it it defies convention.
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Old 08-11-2014, 12:22 AM
  #16  
JetPlaneFlyer
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Did some googling.

If using the housing as the governing criteria for gender is industry convention then it appears that it's far from consistent.

Here is a quote from Wiki on gender designation of electrical connectors:
For example, the female D-subminiature connector body projects outward from the mounting plane of the chassis, and this protrusion could be erroneously construed as male. Instead, the "maleness" of the D-subminiature connectors is defined by specific presence of male pins, rather than by the protrusion of the connector, which is also true for many other pin-based connectors like XLR.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender_..._and_fasteners

So is Wiki wrong and/or is the very common D-Sub connector and the XLR exceptions to convention?

Here's an XLR, the male is on the right, female on the left:


Another good example is the 4 pin Molex connector. The one with the male pins (but female housing) is known as the male connector, the one with the female sockets (but male housing) is the female connector... Another break from convention?.. in fact all the pin connectors i can think of don't appear to follow 'convention'?

Last edited by JetPlaneFlyer; 08-11-2014 at 12:41 AM.
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Old 08-11-2014, 05:09 AM
  #17  
Wrongway-Feldman
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Originally Posted by JetPlaneFlyer View Post
Did some googling.

If using the housing as the governing criteria for gender is industry convention then it appears that it's far from consistent.

Here is a quote from Wiki on gender designation of electrical connectors:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender_..._and_fasteners

So is Wiki wrong and/or is the very common D-Sub connector and the XLR exceptions to convention?

Here's an XLR, the male is on the right, female on the left:


Another good example is the 4 pin Molex connector. The one with the male pins (but female housing) is known as the male connector, the one with the female sockets (but male housing) is the female connector... Another break from convention?.. in fact all the pin connectors i can think of don't appear to follow 'convention'?
That is a terrific point. And it shows the different conventions used in different fields.
Think of a convention as an agreed upon standard within a user community.
Let's say, in a thought experiment, that in a profession they start using a new type of device.
This device is a square box with half painted red and the other blue. Now let's suppose that this box pairs with a mirror opposite box where one half is blue and other is red.
How would you name the boxes. Some people would see a red box with a blue half and some would see a blue box with a red half. Both would be correct.
For a common perspective and usability the industry using said boxes decides on a rule of identifying the two identical boxes. The first step would be to assert a common perspective.
A mark or other means would differentiate between the two boxes. Then a name for each different box would be assigned. In this case perhaps one would be named the left red while the other would be the right red.
That is what a convention is. A set of rules of engagement within an industry for specific devices.
There are however naming conventions that are from long before ISO standardization that still persist.
Case in point is the d-sub connector which is a very old connector indeed.
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Old 08-11-2014, 06:59 AM
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JetPlaneFlyer
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Originally Posted by Wrongway-Feldman View Post
There are however naming conventions that are from long before ISO standardization that still persist.
Case in point is the d-sub connector which is a very old connector indeed.
I'm a mechanical engineer by profession so i do understand industry conventions and standards, but the ones I work with are a lot more widely adhered to than this mals/famale one appears to be. From my investigation so far it seems that there are far more connectors that are exceptions than which follow the convention (I havent found a pin connector that follows it yet!)

So which ISO standard is it? I'm guessing the humble servo connector may well precede it too as they were in use from at least the early 70's when I first experienced RC... and most likely some time before that. So I may yet be right


PS, here's a more modern connector that appears to defy the convention/ISO standard.. The connector in the photo is a SATA male:

http://www.microcenter.com/product/3...a_male_adapter
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Old 08-11-2014, 10:22 AM
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Its a JR Plug. The one it goes into is a JR socket
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Old 08-11-2014, 01:01 PM
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Wrongway-Feldman
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Originally Posted by JetPlaneFlyer;955033


PS, here's a more modern connector that appears to defy the convention/ISO standard.. The connector in the photo is a SATA male:
[IMG
http://c773974.r74.cf2.rackcdn.com/0339521_740472.jpg[/IMG]
http://www.microcenter.com/product/3...a_male_adapter
Sometimes conventions do kind of look like they were decided upon randomly. But in this case the sata male plug was designed to be on a peripheral like a hard drive. On the hard drive you will only find the center connection of the plug and no protective surround. Then after deciding to call it a male plug they decided that on a motherboard or device that can be moved around that the plug needs a way of staying put. That what gives us a outer casing which technically makes it female. But it was first a male so that's what we are stuck with.

One thing to remember is that when looking at hobby electronics like what we have in electric flight is that there is no governing body to set conventions. You name things however you want and hope people extrapolate from knowledge of other conventions so we all call things the same gender. As this thread has demonstrated, this leads to no small amount of confusion.
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Old 08-11-2014, 07:18 PM
  #21  
Turner
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How about this as a convention. Male housing with female connectors and female housing with male connectors.

To me the housing takes precedent as that is really all that is visible initially.
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Old 08-11-2014, 09:37 PM
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If you cant tell a simple female or male plug i feel sorry for some of you guys girlfriends and wives . lol joe
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Old 08-11-2014, 09:53 PM
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Well thanks for that bit of wisdom but the plugs in question are both male and female which is the whole reason this thread was started, in case that fact escaped you.
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Old 08-12-2014, 12:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Turner View Post
Well thanks for that bit of wisdom but the plugs in question are both male and female which is the whole reason this thread was started, in case that fact escaped you.
OK and what dont you understand about a male and female plug ? Its not rocket science ! Geeze BTW if are that confused read the label when you buy it. Turner if its that important to you why dont you start a plug class and teach us. joe
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Old 08-12-2014, 12:20 AM
  #25  
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What don't you understand about a plug that has a female housing and male pins inside or a male housing with female connectors inside?

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