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Aircraft reccomendations for new flyers

Old 12-04-2007, 05:58 AM
  #126  
Biplane Murphy
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$200 gets you a Transmitter(6 channel)....Reciever and servos....the Tx Batts are rechargeable..... Best investment you can make.....my 6 ch. Tx's have memory for 6 planes each....

If you are really going to get into the hobby.... get a good Tx and a Plug and play trainer.....The all that good gear can be used over and over again......the airframe is the cheapest part of the total plane.... the electronics etc. are what cost alot....
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Old 12-04-2007, 06:22 AM
  #127  
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I really need reccommendations for a good aileron trainer.
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Old 12-04-2007, 06:34 AM
  #128  
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I gave you my recommendation for RTF.....

If you wanted a real plane I would suggest a "Sig Kadet 42ep"......Best 4 ch. trainer I have seen yet.....put 4 together so far for other people......But the gear will cost you a few bucks....and the arf is pricey too.....
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Old 12-04-2007, 06:44 AM
  #129  
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Originally Posted by carld2002 View Post
So you don't think that i will need an aileron trainer?
I don't know that you do. That's not to say your won't crash, but if you have some basic skills you probably won't crash badly. Badly being defined as beyond repair. My second plane was a Stryker C. It was a handful and I crashed a couple times, but never badly. I have no doubt that I will crash it again because it is a plane that I can push the limits with.

But back to you. Mostly you need to make the airplane go where you want without having to think "stick left or stick right?". And you have to learn to not over-control, especially when you are landing. Settle into a nice rate of descent and let it glide down. The T-28 should do that just fine.

And those are skills that can be learned on a 3 channel plane. The sim is valuable too.

Personally I believe aileron airplanes are easier to fly than rudder planes. Less forgiving, but easier to fly. Many people don't realize that you won't even use the rudder in the air unless you are doing advanced aerobatics. If you are using a sim, you probably already figured that out.

On your maiden, give yourself plenty of alititude over a big field. Throttle back and cruise. Make nice gentle turns. Be deliberate, and try not to over-control. Land straight into the wind. Nothing fancy, long final approach, settle into a gentle glide path, straight in, don't over-control the flare. Just glide it onto the ground.

You can practice all of that with your 3-channel. It's all about finese.
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Old 12-04-2007, 04:35 PM
  #130  
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Ok, thanks.

So what I will probably do is get the trojan and fly it once or twice.

If I feel that I need an aileron trainer, than I will pick one up.

And another question... what are the chance that floats or skis will work on my skyfly?
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Old 12-04-2007, 05:11 PM
  #131  
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Originally Posted by carld2002 View Post
Ok, thanks.

So what I will probably do is get the trojan and fly it once or twice.

If I feel that I need an aileron trainer, than I will pick one up.

And another question... what are the chance that floats or skis will work on my skyfly?
Does the skyfly have power to spare? Floats add weight and especially drag in the air, so you will need extra power just to fly, let alone take off from the water. You may need to upgrade to brushless power and lipo batteries if it doesn't already have it. Skis probably would be okay without an upgrade so long as they don't weigh much more than wheels.
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Old 12-04-2007, 05:35 PM
  #132  
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Originally Posted by D Payne View Post
Does the skyfly have power to spare? Floats add weight and especially drag in the air, so you will need extra power just to fly, let alone take off from the water. You may need to upgrade to brushless power and lipo batteries if it doesn't already have it. Skis probably would be okay without an upgrade so long as they don't weigh much more than wheels.
Yeah I don't know.

It does fly fine at 2/3 throttle or even a bit less.

I am considering getting something that weighs the same and produces the same amount of drag and testing it out.
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Old 12-04-2007, 10:06 PM
  #133  
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I have another question...

What is usable from the t-28 on arf planes?

Is it just the radio and batteries or are other things usable.

What else would I have to buy to get an arf plane flying?
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Old 12-04-2007, 10:10 PM
  #134  
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You could use the servo, motor, esc, rx if you wanted to, but that woudl require a lot of work.

You cna reuse the transmitter and the batteries. The best thing to do is order all new equipment for the arf. I have shared the RXs before.

Things you will need for an ARF: Servos, servo wire extender (if required), motor, esc, rx,
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Old 12-04-2007, 10:33 PM
  #135  
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Originally Posted by Liquidity View Post
You could use the servo, motor, esc, rx if you wanted to, but that woudl require a lot of work.

You cna reuse the transmitter and the batteries. The best thing to do is order all new equipment for the arf. I have shared the RXs before.

Things you will need for an ARF: Servos, servo wire extender (if required), motor, esc, rx,
You could share an Rx but you have to be careful. You will need to do a thorough pre-flight every time you fly to make sure all the control surfaces are moving correctly. You may need to reverse the servo direction on one or the other of your planes. Most radios have servo reversing switches, so easy to do, but also easy to forget.

Best bet is to just buy a new one for each plane as Liquidity suggests. You can get a cheap one for $20, and a very good one for not much more than $30 if you shop around.

Baterries can be shared, as long as they are the same voltage and about the same weight.
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Old 12-04-2007, 10:51 PM
  #136  
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I always to checks during flight anyways.

My radio will be shared and probably nothing else except perhaps the batteries.

How about recievers? How do they factor into this?

But on a different note....

I took it flying again today.

Unfortunately I misdiagnosed the wind. I thought it was about 3-4 mph but it was actually probably more like 6-7.

it was easily blown far away even with attempts to fly into wind.

It hit a bush and the wind split in half in the exact place hat it did last time.

I have not yet decided if that wing is to be retired or not, but I definately learned an important lesson.
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Old 12-04-2007, 11:23 PM
  #137  
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Originally Posted by carld2002 View Post
I always to checks during flight anyways.

My radio will be shared and probably nothing else except perhaps the batteries.

How about recievers? How do they factor into this?
The receiver is commonly referred to as the Rx (Tx is transmitter). You could buy a spare Parkzone Rx from Horizon Hobby or maybe have your LHS order one. Or you could buy a different brand that will work as well or better (or maybe worse if you want to go cheap). I think Parkzone is negative shift, which means you will have to get either a negative shift or auto-shift Rx and a crystal of the same frequency as that of your T-28. For my money, I would get an auto-shift Berg Rx. They have an excellent reputation.
Originally Posted by carld2002 View Post
Unfortunately I misdiagnosed the wind. I thought it was about 3-4 mph but it was actually probably more like 6-7.

it was easily blown far away even with attempts to fly into wind.
Winds aloft are almost always stronger than they are at ground level. It was probably stonger than 6-7 if you couldn't make headway through it.
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Old 12-04-2007, 11:40 PM
  #138  
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Originally Posted by D Payne View Post
The receiver is commonly referred to as the Rx (Tx is transmitter). You could buy a spare Parkzone Rx from Horizon Hobby or maybe have your LHS order one. Or you could buy a different brand that will work as well or better (or maybe worse if you want to go cheap). I think Parkzone is negative shift, which means you will have to get either a negative shift or auto-shift Rx and a crystal of the same frequency as that of your T-28. For my money, I would get an auto-shift Berg Rx. They have an excellent reputation.

Winds aloft are almost always stronger than they are at ground level. It was probably stonger than 6-7 if you couldn't make headway through it.
Yep, as you go up, winds veer and increase.

So how does compatability work? Will my radio only work with specific receivers, servos or motors? Are batteries only compatable with certain engines? Any good links/advice that you can give me to learn compatability?
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Old 12-05-2007, 12:34 AM
  #139  
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Originally Posted by carld2002 View Post
Yep, as you go up, winds veer and increase.

So how does compatability work? Will my radio only work with specific receivers, servos or motors? Are batteries only compatable with certain engines? Any good links/advice that you can give me to learn compatability?
For standard 72 MHz systems, your Rx (receiver) and Tx (radio transmitter) must be of the same modulation convention (positive shift or negative shift). As long as they match, and as long as you are using the same frequency (channels 11-60 for 72 MHz), you may mix or match brands. Your frequency is determined by the crytal in your Rx. It must match the crystal frequency in your Tx. That's easy. Your Tx will state clearly on the outside what frequency it is. My Parkzone Tx is on channel 50. Just get a crystal of the same channel for your Rx.

Most servos are standard 3-wire, except for some of the RTF stuff from Hobbyzone and maybe some other manufacturers. Not sure about FlyZone. They should all be interchangable, though some larger ones will draw more power.

The motor is controlled by an electronic speed control (ESC). The ESC takes power from the battery and a signal from the Rx and tells the motor how fast to spin. Think of it as a carburetor. There are two major types depending on the motor: brushed and brushless. They are not interchangable. In addition, they come with different amp ratings. The higher the amp rating the bigger the motor it can turn. Use too small of an ESC for the motor and prop combination and it goes poof!

There are two main types of batteries used in RC. NiMH, which is probably what you have in your FlyZone plane, and lithium polymer (lipo). Lipos are lighter and more powerful than NiMH, but they are also more expensive and more volitile. Overcharge one and it will catch on fire or even explode.

You can usually run a motor on either type, but you will have to re-program your ESC for the proper cut-off voltage. Most ESC's are capable of this. Overdischarge a lipo and it is no good, so this is important.

Most motors are made to run on a particular voltage. The more volts you put into it, the faster it will run, but you may run the risk of damaging the motor or decreasing its life. This is especially true of brushed motors. You will get more power from them by increasing the voltage, but they may wear out quicker.

For example, my Super Cub motor came with a 7 cell NiMH. 7 x 1.2 volts per cell = 8.4 volts. Without modification, I can put in an 8 cell NiMH that gives me 9.6 volts (8 x 1.2 volts per cell). The motor runs faster, but I have a little more weight to carry. If I change the cutoff voltage (which can be done on the SC), I can put in a 3 cell lipo that will give me a nominal voltage of 11.1 volts (3 x 3.7 volts per cell). My motor now screams (for a brushed motor), and I am hauling less weight (lipos are lighter), so I get a big increase in performance. But my motor wears out quicker which is no big deal because it only costs $10 for a new one.

This is getting long! And I could go on, but....

There is lots of stuff on these topics already written in other threads. Search around a little and you can learn A LOT from WattFlyer!

Last edited by Fly Time; 12-05-2007 at 03:29 AM.
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Old 12-05-2007, 02:49 AM
  #140  
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That's great and will make fantastic future reference.

Thank You
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Old 12-05-2007, 03:32 AM
  #141  
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Actually it's amps that kill electric motors. You could hook a million volt battery on there and if you keep the amps under the correct rating it's fine. The issue is that usually, at full throttle the ESC is applying the full force of the battery voltage. You can go a little bit over the amperage limit for takeoff and then if you don't hit full throttle again, and you are sure you're under the amp limit, it will be fine. Amps fry things... volts are related, but not the number you need to look at.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:12 AM
  #142  
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So If I decide to get an aileron trainer, what are your reccommendations besides the wing dragon? (not to rule the wing dragon out but I don't think my local stores sell the 4ch version)

Keep it rtf at least for now.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:31 AM
  #143  
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I think it's been said already, but the Stryker was perfect for me! Not that it's exactly a trainer, but it is hard to break.

Of all of my aileron planes (all 3 of them! ), the easiest to fly is actually the ArtTech Corsair. Go figure! But I wouldn't recommend it because it would break easily if you crashed it, plus it's hard to find.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:32 AM
  #144  
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Depending on my spare cash, I may end up getting a stryker anyways.

Probably need a trainer though.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:37 AM
  #145  
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I've said it before.....

You don't need a trainer. You just need to train yourself to fly!
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:45 AM
  #146  
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Strykers are awesome. They are fine for learning to roll and bank a plane, but they are not 4-channels. The only thing you won't learn from it is how to use a rudder. It can get you into the habit of "bank-n-yank" flying, which won't work with some scale-type planes, but will work fine with most plane, particularly jets.
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Old 12-05-2007, 07:11 AM
  #147  
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Originally Posted by jasmine2501 View Post
Actually it's amps that kill electric motors. You could hook a million volt battery on there and if you keep the amps under the correct rating it's fine. The issue is that usually, at full throttle the ESC is applying the full force of the battery voltage. You can go a little bit over the amperage limit for takeoff and then if you don't hit full throttle again, and you are sure you're under the amp limit, it will be fine. Amps fry things... volts are related, but not the number you need to look at.
AMPs do kill motors, however you still need to pay attention to volts too. You could run the risk of burnning up the motor bearings if you push the RPM too high. Each Bl motor has a RPM limit. Keep it within reason/specs and you will be fine. Just like the AMP and watt ratings, you can push it some but you'll pay the price if you push too hard!!!

CTD
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Old 12-05-2007, 07:36 AM
  #148  
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That is true... props have an RPM max also. I wonder though, if it's possible to get a motor over its RPM limit without exceeding the amp limit. I think you either get neither or both problem because as RPM increases, that's what boosts the amps up... either way, you should get something to test it with to make sure you don't go over the limits.
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Old 12-05-2007, 04:42 PM
  #149  
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Originally Posted by jasmine2501 View Post
Strykers are awesome. They are fine for learning to roll and bank a plane, but they are not 4-channels. The only thing you won't learn from it is how to use a rudder. It can get you into the habit of "bank-n-yank" flying, which won't work with some scale-type planes, but will work fine with most plane, particularly jets.
Ahh.

It all depends on how much cash I have after christmas.

The LHS here sells Stryker B's for $180 which is pretty decent.

If I have that much, I will probably get one to learn off it. (they are tanks anyways)
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Old 12-05-2007, 05:56 PM
  #150  
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Jasmine will correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the Stryker B RTF comes with a 27 MHz radio. It won't be compatible with other planes. Maybe you don't care, but you could get a PNP and add an Rx that is compatible with your T-28 72 MHz radio. Just something to consider.

I have also heard that the B is discontinued, so whatever your LHS has in stock might be all that is available. IMHO, the C is no harder to fly, and all that power is really fun once you can handle it. Until then fly it at half throttle. Costs more but worth it!
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