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-   -   WWI planes (https://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=259)

floss 11-04-2009 10:16 AM

Nice one Chris

details 11-04-2009 10:52 PM

Chris,

I concur wholeheartedly! Very nice job! :D

So which GWS kit of the Tigi did you base it on? I don't recognize the undercarriage. What did you carve the nose pattern from?

Hope I'm not being too demanding, it's just that I have been wanting to do this for so long and things just keep getting in the way. Hopefully your lead will spur me on to get moving on mine.:)

Please include all of us when you start working on it again!:o

Thanks,
Dave

WWI Ace 11-05-2009 01:02 AM

My name is Steve and I too am addicted to WWI crates!!!!

dbcisco 11-05-2009 01:26 AM

1. I am powerless over ailerons and my wife has become unmanageable
2. Came to believe that a plane better than mine can restore me to sanity.
3. Made a decision to turn my life and paycheck over to the care of my LHS.
4. Made a searching and fearless inventory of my workshop.
5. Admitted to my club mates and on the forums the exact nature of our errors.
6. Were entirely ready to have friends remove all these defects of our flying habits.
7. Humbly asked for help to resolve our short landings.
8. Made a list of all aircraft we had crashed, and became willing to repair them all.
9. Made repairs to such aircraft wherever possible, except when to do so would hurt new projects.
10. Continued to take inventory and when needed promptly purchased parts.
11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with all things RC and the power to carry them aloft.
12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, carry this message to other hobbyists, and continue to add to our fleet and friends.

capn chaos 11-05-2009 01:32 AM

Hello, my name is Bob and I havent discharged a lipo in 63 minutes.

degreen60 11-05-2009 01:35 AM

How many WW1 airplanes do you have to have before you know you have a problem? I have 12 flying, 2 being built, and dreaming about which one to start next. I think I really need help, wife caught me trying to get money out of her purse to buy RC parts for another WW1 plane.

Bub Steve 11-05-2009 01:44 AM


Originally Posted by capn chaos (Post 658816)
Hello, my name is Bob and I havent discharged a lipo in 63 minutes.

Hi Bob,,Bubsteve

capn chaos 11-05-2009 01:46 AM

Yo Bub,
Have seen ya round the threads, glad to see you guys in shadesville are still with us. Still cant figure where you get those 25 hour days though.

Bub Steve 11-05-2009 01:55 AM

capt,C::were powerless over our fly'in vices and love'in it! bubsteve

7car7 11-05-2009 05:31 PM

1 Attachment(s)

Originally Posted by details (Post 658759)

So which GWS kit of the Tigi did you base it on? I don't recognize the undercarriage. What did you carve the nose pattern from?

It's the typical GWS Pico TM. Little one. It has a GWS Geared 350 in it, as opposed to the IPS. Slightly heavier, but still a great floater. It's only 10oz with battery.

The landing gear uses the original rear leg, and I added the front legs to look more like the real plane. It has a carbon tube that goes thru the fuse, and the front legs are bent and inserted into the carbon tube. Rubber band keeps them together, and acts as a shock absorber. THe skinny thing you see is braided fishing line that forms an X under there to keep the legs from spreading. Light simple and strong.

Not sure what you mean by carving the nose pattern? It's just plastic, from a bottle, cut and glued with GWS contact cement.

degreen60 11-05-2009 05:47 PM


Originally Posted by 7car7 (Post 658966)
It's just plastic, from a bottle, cut and glued with GWS contact cement.

Did you over lap the glue joints or glue the edges together?

I think the TM would bash nice into a Fairey Swordfish. But then that is a WW2 airplane and might not keep the shakes away. LOL

dbcisco 11-05-2009 08:22 PM

I was thinking the TM would make a decent Rumpler with a little work.

7car7 11-05-2009 10:51 PM


Originally Posted by degreen60 (Post 658970)
Did you over lap the glue joints or glue the edges together?

I think the TM would bash nice into a Fairey Swordfish. But then that is a WW2 airplane and might not keep the shakes away. LOL


Yep, I overlapped all the joints. Held it together with clothes pins.

I agree, the TM is a great fuse to start with for bashing. I keep thinking I want to do something wild with one. Seal up the forward cockpit, and change the nose a bit, and you've got some cool looking Golden Age planes, or possibly even something more modern. It's harder to really go back in time to WWI with them though, they are sort of on the sleek side. Perhaps you could shorten the fuse to give it a more "thick" look like some of the WWI planes.

http://www.aviastar.org/pictures/eng..._swordfish.gif

details 11-05-2009 11:09 PM


Originally Posted by 7car7 (Post 658966)
It's the typical GWS Pico TM. Little one. It has a GWS Geared 350 in it, as opposed to the IPS. Slightly heavier, but still a great floater. It's only 10oz with battery.

Not sure what you mean by carving the nose pattern? It's just plastic, from a bottle, cut and glued with GWS contact cement.

Thanks Chris, when you said that you made the nose from a soda bottle, I thought you meant you heat formed it over a pattern. But now I know you made it by glueing pieces together! Still not sure how you formed some of the sections such as the top hump of the fairing though.

Thanks,
Dave

7car7 11-05-2009 11:23 PM


Originally Posted by details (Post 659042)
Still not sure how you formed some of the sections such as the top hump of the fairing though.

Thanks,
Dave

Ha! That was the easiest part! That's the lower "leg" of the soda bottle. It's already formed, I just cut it out. There's what, 6 of them per bottle?
Actually not quite authentic - the Gipsy used a sheet metal cowling, and didn't really have much compound curves. Mine was just meant to be a slight likeness, and basically simple. Thin styrene plastic is good for making this stuff too, in fact, that's what the triangle shapes on each side are, since they are flat.

Ron 11-09-2009 08:25 AM

Well...I got my WW1 building fix this weekend..I was fortunate enough to have 2 days of uninterrupted building time...man was that sweet...I now have my "new" Dr1 all set up on the bench
on top of the garbage can... ( my setup stand ) :blah: ready for the cabane struts..which I'll make this week...then it's back to finishing the fuselage.
So far I have all three wings and ailerons done almost ready for covering, pull pull system is in for the ailerons, ...once the cabanes are finished, I'll plank the fuselage, then on to sanding the tail feathers to make them ready for covering...then install the pull pull for the elevators and the rudder...this is going quicker than the last time...man must be something about second time around..I don't seem to be running into all the little problems I did on the first go around...pics later this week.

Gonzo007 11-09-2009 02:52 PM

Sounds like you are moving through this build pretty fast Ron. Looking forward to the pictures.

Colin

Ron 11-11-2009 07:45 PM

Do we have any wheel experts here? I need to build a set of wheels for my DR1...I was going to use the williams bros type ....9 3/8" until I found out that they weigh almost three pounds :mad: ::oi'm hoping I can build a pair at less than half of that.....I have done some previously, but since I'm always trying to improve my knowledge base and skill set, I'm looking for ideas here....also looking for 1/3 sized Spandaus... the last ones i made up were kinda cartoon scale..made them from monokote tubes and balsa...seems the tubes are exactly 1/3 full size :rolleyes:

scalercflyer 11-12-2009 01:19 AM

How to build wheels
 
Here you go Ron. Check this out. You can build them to any size you want and build them light too! Marty
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showt...t=spoke+wheels

Ron 11-12-2009 03:36 AM

Yeah Marty, i was sorta thinking about that method, but since the wheels would be covered anyway ( painted red) I might go for a 3/32 plywood disc lightened as much as I dare, and put a foam shape on it...only problem is the tires...I don't seem to have a lot of luck making them stay on...so maybe I'll split a piece of that grey foam beading, and find some sort of glue to glue them onto the plywood discs...then the plywood rim would take all the stress....or If I can ever figure out how to split rubber hose in a straight line...never seem to be able to keep the cut straight on the darned things.......

WWI Ace 11-12-2009 07:20 PM

Have you seen how the wheels are made in the kits that www.aerodromerc.com sells? Check out their site for construction manuals and see how they do it. Steve

floss 11-13-2009 11:50 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Ply and depron wheels with an o-ring or foam tire are light and strong. Depending on the size of the plane you can sandwich either one 3mm or 6mm piece of depron to alter the width. Then on one side glue the same piece of depron and sand it to the cone shape you desire. I have several sizes of aluminium tube that I use to make a hub. After making a few its a 15 minute affair to make two.

They look good with a shrink covering like solite.

Ron 11-13-2009 07:32 PM

Floss those are good looking wheels.......I am going to see if I can come up with a "tire" then I'll make the rims...I'll be looking for about a 9 1/2" O ring...I'm thinking one from plastic pipe like storm sewer pipe or something like that might work...I like the depron idea over the plywood....I have the axles figured out, just am stuck on the tires....i have seen lots machined out of aluminum, but they're just almost as heavy as the plastic wheels, and some don't keep tires on very well.........I don't need tires falling off :p>..............I have enough trouble keeping other things together without that :rolleyes:...... model will weigh about 10 or 11 pounds.
I will have a total framed up weight this weekend I hope....framing and sheeting is almost complete...just need to sand out the seams from joining the sheeting, do some 1/16 by 5/16 trim strips, sand my brains out, then it's ready for motor radio/servos, and covering. I'm doing pull pull on everything this time .....ailerons too....I need to fabricate a cowl...that will take a bit of time :eek:

7car7 11-16-2009 06:42 AM

Decided my SE5a deserved a propper prop.
 
4 Attachment(s)
I'm sick, what can I say. This silly little project has about 20 or so hours into it. Part of that was modding the patterns on a computer, and about 16 hours went into actually building it.

Mahogany and Bass, each 1/16 thick. Glued up with CA, then a layer of .5oz glass and epoxy added to the back to make it more stiff. It weighs about 5 grams, about 1/2 as much as the original Electrifly prop.

scalercflyer 11-16-2009 06:32 PM

Propper prop
 
That's a nice 7car7!

Biplane Murphy 11-17-2009 12:24 AM


Originally Posted by 7car7 (Post 661823)
I'm sick, what can I say. This silly little project has about 20 or so hours into it. Part of that was modding the patterns on a computer, and about 16 hours went into actually building it.

Mahogany and Bass, each 1/16 thick. Glued up with CA, then a layer of .5oz glass and epoxy added to the back to make it more stiff. It weighs about 5 grams, about 1/2 as much as the original Electrifly prop.

Yes, you are a sick, sick person......LOL
But here in the WWI thread, we all are!!
:D:):D

Nice prop!!

degreen60 11-17-2009 01:32 AM


Originally Posted by Biplane Murphy (Post 662002)
Yes, you are a sick, sick person......LOL
But here in the WWI thread, we all are!!
:D:):D

Nice prop!!

I am here to help all you sick people. Repeat after me "I have extra WW1 RC planes I can throw away", now keep repeating that till you believe it. Now go pack those planes your want to throw away and ship to me for recycle.

dbcisco 11-17-2009 02:33 AM

Giving away your planes is a quick way to make room for more planes.
My address is......:D:D:D:D

scalercflyer 11-17-2009 03:02 AM

Oh No!
 
Oh No Guys!!! :eek: I deserve all of those homeless WWI planes ..... take a hike! :eek::D;) marty

Biplane Murphy 11-17-2009 06:27 AM

LOL at all WWI thread posters!!!

7car7 11-17-2009 04:04 PM

I occasionally travel about 20 miles one way to fly planes with a big group of guys at a school. Most of them just don't get this stuff. Couple of gassers, lot's of profile foamies (do look like fun really), and several modern aerobatic built up jobs. But really only 2 other guys besides myself that really get into the WWI stuff. They both go nuts for this stuff (8-9 month plane projects, fancy wood props). But most are more like "If I can't go to the store and pick a plane and have it flying in 3 hours, then it's too difficult"

dbcisco 11-17-2009 04:12 PM

It is the "now" generation(s). I guess I was from the "enjoy the journey as well as the destination" generation. Actually it is because of my DIY father.

scalercflyer 11-17-2009 06:30 PM

Amen
 
I say AMEN to that db! :D I still scratch build and kit build (when I can find them). I hate the fact that there are fewer and fewer kits being produced. :mad: We are a vanishing breed Gentlemen. :( As for myself, I intend to go out still building and flying WWI airplanes. I will never give up this hobby. BTW I feel blessed to have this group of Friends here. :) I appreciate all of you Guys! :D Marty

degreen60 11-17-2009 07:02 PM


Originally Posted by dbcisco (Post 662229)
It is the "now" generation(s). I guess I was from the "enjoy the journey as well as the destination" generation. Actually it is because of my DIY father.

I am from the "have nothing" generation. I use what ever I can find free to make my planes. Kids now think they have to have a cell phone. I remember when to get a phone you had to get on list and wait to get on a party line.

TM4197 11-17-2009 09:47 PM

I would love to have all the money I have spent in 40 years of making planes. And I enjoyed building just about all of them. It seems now, the older I get, the more I can appreciate the fact that
"I CAN" go to the store or internet and get a quick "almost some sort of scale" WWI plane and fly the living daylights out of it. Yes, it took me 3 hours to glue foam! Where as before it would take that long to prepare the plans and kit in order to even start building. Time is important to some people. I think everyone should at least build one traditional model, its good for the soul. But, if you can find a halfway decent model and tweek some things to make it look as good as you want it and it flies good, then foamies or ARF's or whatever at least has them out there flying and supporting the modeling world. I have been to some airfields where members ( some are right here in WATTSFLYERS) refused to let ARF'S (foam) fly. Mine was a SIG D-VII. Thats good for the hobby huh! Alot of my retired friends cannot afford to buy the build up scale models anymore, as much as they want to build them...they buy the ARF's be it foam or whatever...just so they can still fly! They can tell you everything about the plane, its pilots, the squadrons etc. So, I love anyone that has the ability to keep flying, especially WWI birds, be it wood, paper, foam, CF or whatever. The funny thing is, I saw the most beautiful Spad that took the guy 8 months to build, and a ARF SPAD...probably 4 hours of build time, when they flew by together...you couldnt tell the difference, they both looked grand flying low and slow. But, when they were on the ground, the real build up SPAD got all the pats on the back...and rightfully so! But the ARF guy was smiling as much as the other when he was flying it!:D Kutos to all who still can build and fly....and kutos to all who keep flying period!

Ron 11-18-2009 03:56 AM

flying the ARF's is fine ......assembling them is good too...it keeps us in the hobby......and I agree likely they are responsible for the hobby growing some....as for me, if I really really like a particular airplane, I find some photos of it, scale them up to whatever size I want the finished model to be, ...draw plans...start making balsa chips and sawdust...I enjoy this part of it just as much as the flying... gets the creative and imaginative part of me going....and there's a certain amount of special feeling knowing that your idea went from thinking, to action.... to a flying model and no you don't need lots of tools...and no I'm not special...anyone can be creative if they choose .........tools???..if you saw my miserable tool set, you would laugh...it consists of a coping saw...three or four sheets of sand paper, a small "zona" hand saw...and two or three disposable razor knives bought at the nearest dollar store
.....building with this setup, and communicating with this group of fellow "sickos" here on the WW1 forum has brought me many enjoyable hours :ws:

TM4197 11-18-2009 04:10 AM

Ok Ron....you make me feel better now....I have one more saw than you, but the blade is about 10 years old. But, you are up on me with the sand paper! i am using my wifes fiber nail file.:eek: I love looking at the planes you guys keep coming with..the mods are incredible and I always pick up new ideas from here. My building from scratch days are over, and I know exactly what you mean from design to flight..you can't beat it! But the guys who are WW1 freaks who now have a chance to build ( well, sorta) and then fly a plane they grew up reading about, and know the intire history of it is just a great thing. :D

scalercflyer 11-18-2009 04:20 AM

Right on!
 
Ron, TM, I couldn't agree more with your comments. I collect plans for WWI aircraft for a couple of reasons. First I anticipate building just about everyone of them. Second I like to share them with anyone interested in scratch building them. They are simple, non complex plans that can be modified or built out of many different types of materials. I also collect as many kits as I can lay my hands on. The kit manufacturers don't see the need to make kits anymore. What a pity! I too come from the "I had nothing generation". My Father used to say "you want it, build it yourself. You know where the tools are". This allowed me to take pride in myself and my accomplishments which is sadly lacking in our "now" generation. Watching an airplane you put togther (non ARF) go from plans to kit to finished product instills in us a great deal of pride in our workmanship. The rattiest plane I ever built was still a masterpiece to me. We need to nuture building skills with those who are willing to learn them or we will go the way of the dinosaur. As for myself, I will continue to build and fly until the Good LORD takes me home. Marty

dbcisco 11-18-2009 04:32 AM

I confess. I have RTFs, ARFs, static models, kits and scratch builds.
I love them all. I even love to just hold them in my hands and let my mind wander into the past. They give me my childhood back.

TM4197 11-18-2009 04:38 AM

dbcisco..."I even love to just hold them in my hands and let my mind wander into the past. They give me my childhood back".

You still talking models here right? :Q


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